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21 Incredible Minimalist Movie Posters

January, 2013

Could Pedro Nobre Be the First UFC Fighter Ever to Be Released For Faking an Injury? [UPDATED]

This is Pedro Nobre, the TUF: Brazil alum who made his UFC debut last weekend at UFC on FX 7 against fellow Brazilian Iuri Alcantara. As you can tell from the neck brace he is sporting in the above photo, his debut did not go well. Alcantara landed a few supposedly illegal shots to the back of Nobre’s dome, and likely in an effort to make up for his poor performance during the Alessio Sakara/Patrick Cote debacle at UFC 154, referee Dan Miragliotta waved the bout off and declared it a no contest when Nobre was unable to continue.

The only problem was that 90% of the shots Alcantara landed, if not all of them, were neither illegal nor all that devastating (at least from our perspective), which prompted Dana White to post the following on Twitter:

In fact, White became so enraged by Nobre’s Oscar-worthy performance that he recently all but completely closed the door on Nobre’s future UFC aspirations.

After the jump: White’s scathing comments, along with a gif of the stoppage.

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CagePotato Databomb #3: Breaking Down the UFC Flyweights by Striking Performance

(Click chart for full-size versionFor previous Databombs, click here.)

By Reed Kuhn, @Fightnomics

The UFC flyweights comprise the smallest division — both in size, and in numbers — but they’ll get a prominent showcase this Saturday at UFC on FOX 6, as Demetrious Johnson defends his title against John Dodson. So how do Mighty Mouse and the Magician stack up against the rest of their 125-pound competition? Analyzing an entire UFC weight class with a point-in-time assessment allows us to see how fighters might perform against each other, even though they may not meet in the Octagon for a long time (if ever). And since every fight starts standing up, we’ll also start with striking.

The Analysis:

In order to understand standup striking performance, which is more multifaceted in MMA than it is in boxing, I need to boil down a few of the most important variables that determine success as a striker. These are fairly uncomplicated variables in isolation, but together they can summarize a fighter’s overall capabilities. Here, I’ve focused on three fundamental, offensive metrics:

Accuracy: I’ve used power head-striking accuracy (as opposed to body or leg strikes, or jabs to the head), where the average for UFC Flyweights is about 25%. Certainly, great strikers can attack the body and legs, but the most likely way to end a fight by strikes is by aiming at the head. The accuracy of the power head strike is a great indicator of a fighter’s striking prowess, and there’s a wide range within a single division, as we’ll see. This is the vertical axis, so more accurate fighters are higher in the graph.

Standup Striking Pace: Prior analysis reveals that outpacing your opponent is a key predictor of success, and certainly correlates with winning decisions as it reflects which fighter is dictating the pace of the fight. Here, I’ve used the total number of standup strikes thrown as a ratio to the same output from a fighter’s opponents. All strikes attempted from a standup position are counted, including body shots and leg kicks. This is the horizontal axis in the graph, and the average for the whole division must be 1, so fighters with superior pace appear further to the right.

Knockdown Rate: The objective of every strike thrown is to hurt your opponent, and knockdowns reflect which fighters connect with the most powerful strikes. I’ve used the total number of knockdowns a fighter has landed in their matches*, divided by the number of power head strikes landed to see who does the most damage per strike. The size of the bubble for a fighter indicates their relative knockdown rate; the bigger the bubble, the higher their knockdown rate. The very small bubbles indicate fighters who have yet to score a knockdown in their Zuffa fights.

* The data includes all UFC, WEC, and Strikeforce fights through UFC 155 on December 29th, 2012. Many of these fighters competed in other higher weight classes, but for the purposes of this analysis, that data was still included and analyzed.

Now that we know how to interpret the chart, let’s see which fighters stand out…

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Exclusive: ‘King Mo’ Looks to Regain His Crown After Year-Long Exile



By Elias Cepeda

With how often former Strikeforce light-heavyweight champion Muhammed Lawal talks about money, one might think it is his only motivation. He can go on and on about how cash motivates him during fights and how he invests wisely so as not to have to depend solely on professional fighting for income.

Lawal’s financial focus fits in well with the namesake of the Mayweather Boxing Club in Las Vegas, where Lawal does much of his training these days. (San Jose, CA, the home of the American Kickboxing Academy where he has previously trained during fight camps, got “too expensive,” according to Mo.) But just as with Floyd Mayweather Jr., there is a lot more substance behind the former wrestler’s style and talk.

The fighter known as “King Mo” has not been able to fight professionally for over a year because of a suspension stemming from a positive steroid test after his last fight against Lorenz Larkin. So, for the past year Mo has not gotten paid a red cent to fight — yet he says his motivation to train hard never waned.

“I never had a problem [staying motivated]. Never,” he tells CagePotato. “I love being in the gym, I love working out. My mind is always on fighting of some sort.”

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Colin “Freakshow” Fletcher to Face Fellow ‘TUF’ Runner Up Mike Ricci at UFC 158


(“Hey Norman, ever play skin the cat?”)

As Dana White announced earlier today at the UFC 158 press conference, a lightweight bout between TUF: The Smashes lightweight runner up and presumable collector of Haunter Pokemon memorabilia, Colin Fletcher, has been booked to take on TUF 16 runner up and sensitive artist, Mike Ricci, on the welterweight-heavy UFC 158 card in March.

On the heels of a UD loss to Northern Ireland’s “Stormin” Norman Parke at UFC on FX 6, Fletcher will no doubt be looking to utilize his reach advantage against Ricci, who will be making the drop from welterweight following a unanimous decision loss of his own to Colton Smith at the TUF 16 Finale. Ricci has gone win-loss in his past six contests, including notable losses to Daron Cruickshank and Pat Curran, and holds notable wins over Strikeforce veteran Jordan Mein and Canadian Rory MacDonald…

…I’m sorry, that’s Canadian Rory McDonell, who was able to score his last victory by, and I quote, “Gogoplata Straight Armbar.” Seriously, if you doubt me, just check out this photo of the finish. How that sub was somehow overlooked by nearly every MMA site out there is beyond me, but feel free to discuss this massive oversight in the comments section. Because, let’s be real, it’s probably more interesting than the subject at hand.

-J. Jones

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Prepare for War: Dana White Says Josh Barnett is “Probably” Headed Back to the UFC


(“Why yes, Dana, the blonde gentleman in the lower left *is* my doctor. What of it?”)

The Sam and Diane relationship between Josh Barnett and the UFC continues to forge ahead, Potato Nation. Fortunately, we have more than an outdated UFC.com profile to go with this time. During the media scrum following the UFC 158 press conference earlier today, Dana White was questioned by MMAMania about the likelihood of seeing “The Warmaster” back in the octagon, and the UFC President was surprisingly optimistic:

I have not (spoken with Barnett). It’s probably going to happen.

There you have it; absolute and undeniable proof that Barnett is back, baby. And here you thought we were just tugging your respective dicks this whole time. Shame on you.

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Jorge Santiago Returns to the Octagon Against Gunnar Nelson at ‘UFC on FUEL 7′ in London


(Jorge and Bigfoot: They run Bartertown. / Photo via Sherdog)

Arguably the most talented fighter to be included in our 50 Worst Fighters in UFC History list, Jorge Santiago‘s undeniable abilities as a knockout artist and BJJ practitioner have mysteriously failed him inside the Octagon. The former Sengoku champion and Strikeforce Middleweight Grand Prix winner has already burned through two stints with the UFC, which both ended in back-to-back losses. But thanks to an injury withdrawal on the UFC on FUEL 7: Barao vs. McDonald card, Santiago is getting a third chance to prove himself.

The UFC has confirmed that TUF 13 castmember Justin Edwards has pulled out of his February 16th welterweight match against undefeated Icelandic phenom Gunnar Nelson due to an undisclosed injury, and will be replaced by Santiago. On paper, this is a much better matchup than the original one — Nelson vs. Edwards felt like somewhat of a mismatch, while Santiago is certainly on Nelson’s level in terms of talent, and has far more fight experience. Then again, Santiago has been straight-up cursed inside the UFC. The most we can say is that it’ll be a much better gauge of how good Gunnar really is, and if he deserves the hype that has followed him into the UFC.

Santiago won two fights last year under the Titan FC banner, both by first round stoppage, and he currently trains with the Blackzilians. For a complete lineup of the UFC on FUEL 7 card, follow us after the jump…

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So Can We Just Assume That Frankie Edgar vs. Jose Aldo Will Be Marred By Controversy, Then?


(Yep, that guy in the middle is going to be the referee. And that’s not even the scariest part.)

It is a pretty well known fact that Frankie Edgar has been at the center of some controversial decisions during his run as the UFC lightweight champion (and before it, and after it…). It is also a pretty well known fact that Steve Mazzagatti has been responsible for more botched calls in his refereeing career then Carly Rae Jepsen was in 2012. It is also also a well known fact that many of the current judges in MMA couldn’t tell a leg kick from a kneebar if their lives depended on it.

So with all that in mind, you’d think the Nevada State Athletic Commission would try their hardest (or try at all, really) to ensure that the upcoming featherweight title fight between Edgar and Jose Aldo at UFC 156 would be held under the supervision of the sport’s finest referees and judges, as to avoid any controversy that could possibly come as a result of their own incompetence. You would be wrong. As MMAJunkie reports:

During a meeting Tuesday in Las Vegas, the Nevada State Athletic Commission tapped veteran referee Steve Mazzagatti to officiate UFC 156′s main event.

Additionally, the commission named Adelaide Byrd, Jeff Collins and Junichiro Kamijo to judge the featherweight title fight, which pits champ Jose Aldo (21-1 MMA, 3-0 UFC) against ex-lightweight champ Frankie Edgar (14-3-1 MMA, 9-3-1 UFC). 

My God, that was like reading over the list of dinner specials at a Tallahassee Denny’s establishment. At 4 a.m. Sure, the food looks decent enough when doctored up on the glossy menu, and besides, you’re already half in the bag. But then you happen to take a glance at the nutritional facts…and your heart suddenly sinks with the realization that there is no way your night doesn’t end with anything but rhythmic bouts of explosive diarrhea and shame.

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‘TUF 17: Team Jones vs. Team Sonnen,’ Episode 1 — The Good, The Bad, And the Ugly

The Ultimate Fighter returned last night with the two-hour premiere of “Team Jones vs. Team Sonnen,” and since the show is no longer on Friday nights, we figured we’d give it a look. Full results from the 14 middleweight elimination fights and team selections are at the end of this post, but first, let’s run through what worked, what didn’t, and what really didn’t…

The Good
- Allowing the fighters’ friends and family members to watch their elimination fights. It raised the emotional stakes for the competitors, removed the eerie silence that plagued the elimination rounds of previous seasons, and led to moments like this. Also, Andy Enz’s dad should be hired as an assistant coach. ”REFUSE TO LOSE!”

- The stoppages. Eight of the 14 elimination fights ended in the first round. In general, there weren’t a lot of point-fighters or reality-show goofballs on display — just a bunch of raw, aggressive dudes who came to win.

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Watch Nick Diaz Actually Show Up for the UFC 158 Kickoff Press Conference, Right Here at 10 a.m. ET


(Props: YouTube.com/UFC)

Georges St. Pierre and Nick Diaz will be in attendance this morning for the first UFC 158 press-conference at the Bell Centre in Montreal, hyping their March 16th welterweight title fight. According to MMAJunkie, Diaz has successfully made a flight to Montreal — yes, this is actually newsworthy — which means we hopefully won’t have a repeat of the no-shows that got him fired from UFC 137. Will Diaz be openly confrontational now that he’s face to face with his least-favorite Canadian? Or will he just do his vaguely hostile mumbly thing? Watch the headliners field questions from media in the video player above, beginning at 10 a.m. ET / 7 a.m. PT, and please share your insights in the comments section.

Previously:
- Of Course Nick Diaz Isn’t Returning Dana White’s Phone Calls
- UFC 158 Odds: Georges St. Pierre Opens as a 4-1 Favorite Over Nick Diaz
- St. Pierre Explains Why He’s Fighting Diaz at UFC 158; Hendricks to Face Jake Ellenberger

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Lloyd Irvin Finally Breaks Silence Regarding New Year’s Eve & 1989 Rape Incidents in Open Letter

The recent information that has been unearthed regarding renowned martial arts trainer Lloyd Irvin and two of his students is nothing short of horrific. One such allegation dates back to 1989, and involves Irvin’s role in the gang rape of a 17 year-old woman. The other involves the rape of one of Irvin’s students on New Year’s Eve, as perpetrated by two other students of the Lloyd Irvin Martial Arts School in Washington, D.C. Despite being vehemently pressed for information over the past few weeks, Irvin has remained silent on both cases, instead focusing his attention on the recovery of the female student that was accosted.

That is, until now.

Irvin recently issued a statement in the form of an open letter that addressed both his own involvement in the 1989 case and that of the New Year’s Eve case currently under investigation. In it, Irvin is both understandably apologetic and sincerely candid while describing the circumstances involved in both cases. Not to take anything away from as well respected a member of the MMA community as Irvin, we have placed the entire letter, completely unedited, after the jump. It’s a long read, but ultimately necessary if you want to understand the events from the perspective of at least one of the parties involved.

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