Steroids in MMA
Which MMA Fighter Will Test Positive For Steroids Next?

September, 2014

The 7 Biggest UFC Busts of All Time: 2014 Edition

It’s been quite a while since we first penned our list of the 7 Biggest UFC Busts of All Time, and a lot has changed in the time since. While some of our choices are even more relevant now than they were when the list was originally published in July of 2009, most of them seem either inaccurate or simply out of date in light of current circumstances. Knowing what we know now, we’ve decided to update our list to align with today’s MMA landscape. Enjoy.

#7 – Robert Drysdale

Robert Drysdale had already achieved the distinction of being one of the most credentialed Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu competitors and sought-after coaches in all of MMA when he signed with the UFC last year. He had also picked up six straight first round submissions in professional competition, and was primed to make some huge waves in the UFC’s light heavyweight division.

But oh, if only it were that simple. Drysdale was first scheduled to take on Ednaldo Oliveira at UFC 163 until he was forced out of the bout at the last minute due to a “lingering staph infection” and definitely not the fact that he had been denied a therapeutic use exemption for TRT days prior. He was then scheduled to face Cody Donovan at UFC 167, but was denied licensure after an out-of-competition drug test came back with an absolutely absurd 19.4:1 testosterone-to-epitestosterone (T/E) ratio.

You’d think the UFC would have shitcanned Drysdale right then and there, but The Baldfather is nothing if not a softie for guys with a great ground game (lol!). Drysdale was given another shot at the TUF 19 Finale in July, and to his credit, he actually managed to show up and submit Keith Berish in just over 2 minutes. The post-fight drug test, however, would reveal that Drysdale was once again competing with an unnatural level of testosterone flowing through his veins. But hey, at least his T/E ratio was only 12:1 this time!

One fight. Two failed drug tests. And to our knowledge, Drysdale is still employed by the UFC. Let’s hope he can get his sh*t together long enough to pick up one legitimate win before all is said and done.

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The TUF 20 Checklist, Episode 1: A Loaded Bracket, An Early Upset, And the Coin That REFUSED TO DIE


(Here’s what the TUF 20 bracket looks like after episode 1; click image for full size version. Team Pettis is in green, Team Melendez is in purple. Props: Reddit MMA)

Last night’s premiere episode of The Ultimate Fighter: A Champion Will Be Crowned ended with Invicta FC standout Tecia Torres losing in a major upset, when she dropped a three-round decision to the relatively unheralded Randa Markos. If you think that’s a “spoiler” because you haven’t watched the episode yet, well, now you know how the rest of us feel. Due to some epic screw-ups by the UFC production team, the Torres/Markos result was briefly revealed on the broadcast before the fight had even aired, and UFC.com posted an episode recap while the show was still going on. Those are spoilers, my friends.

But all that weirdness aside, TUF 20 episode 1 was a highly satisfying two hours — and not just because the CagePotato logo appeared on the broadcast several times (!) in footage from Rose Namajunas’s Invicta fights. In an interesting change of format, the 16 strawweight competitors were given seeding-numbers based on their rank in the division, and placed into a bracket; #1-ranked Carla Esparza will fight #16-ranked Angela Hill, #2-ranked Joanne Calderwood will fight #15-ranked Emily Kagan, and so on. Coaches Anthony Pettis and Gilbert Melendez still got to pick their teams based on which fighters they liked best after an evaluation session — and they’ll still decide the order of the fights — but they weren’t given the seed-numbers beforehand. It worked out like this…

Instead of giving you a scene-by-scene rundown of everything that happened on the show, we’d like to debut the TUF 20 Checklist, which will hopefully hit the major themes that you’ll be seeing each week. Here we go…

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Hot Potato: 22 Photos of Jessica Storie, Warrior Nation Ring Girl and Playboy “Miss Social”


(All photos via Jessica’s Playboy page and Instagram.)

Once again, a major round of applause is in order for BabesofMMA, who introduced us to Jessica “Anything But a Horror” Storie, a Warrior Nation ring girl and Playboy’s “Miss Social August 2013″ hailing from Dalton, Massachusetts.

According to her Model Mayhem page, Jessica is a creative-minded singer/songwriter currently using her hotness to pay her way through college. She also appears to be an absolute master of the selfie. It’s the American dream fully realized, folks, except for the part about her not being willing to do nudes. :(

Check out our favorite photos of Jessica in the gallery after the jump, then make sure to follow her on Twitter and Instagram.

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‘The Ultimate Fighter 20: A Champion Will Be Crowned’ Premieres Tonight on FOX Sports 1


(Props: YouTube.com/UFC)

The most high-stakes season of TUF since “The Comeback” kicks off tonight, as The Ultimate Fighter: A Champion Will Be Crowned debuts on FOX Sports 1 at 10 p.m. ET / 7 p.m. PT. Yes, that’s the official title of the season, but feel free to keep calling it TUF 20, or TUF: Strawweights, or TUF: Easy on the Eyes, Hard on the Face, or TUF: A Buncha Catty Broads Complaining About That One Bitch at Work.

And because our buddy Angela “Overkill” Hill didn’t really get any screen-time in the media day promo (see above), here’s a video of her choking out that mark-ass Greg Kelly last week on Good Day New York.

After the jump: A handy, bingo-card-sized guide to the TUF 20 cast.

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Pro Wrestling Star and MMA Fighter Sean O’Haire Dead at 43 [UPDATED]


(O’Haire as a WCW rookie in 2000.)

The pro-wrestler, MMA fighter, and kickboxer known as Sean O’Haire (real name Sean Christopher Haire) died Monday at his home in Spartanburg, South Carolina, at the age of 43. A cause of death has not been announced yet. Update, via TMZ: “According to local police, O’Haire committed suicide. He was found in his bedroom beside his bed, with a red rope tied around his neck and connected to the bedpost. His body was discovered by his father, who then called 911.”

A native of Hilton Head Island, O’Haire was a lifelong student of the martial arts, who competed in Toughman competitions and boxing matches during the 1990s. He also wrestled briefly on the independent circuit, and owned a gym on Hilton Head called Breakthrough Fitness Center before making his mark in professional wrestling.

O’Haire made his WCW debut in June 2000, winning a tag team match with Mark Jindrak, and went on to win three WCW World Tag Team Championships; he was also named the 2000 “Rookie of the Year” by the Wrestling Observer. O’Haire began performing in the WWE in 2001 — following the WWE’s purchase of WCW — and appeared regularly through 2003 as his “devil’s advocate” persona.

After officially parting ways with the WWE in 2004, O’Haire made a successful transition into MMA with a guillotine choke win against Tony Towers, and went on to compile a 4-2 record in MMA, with appearances in Rumble on the Rock, Hero’s, and PRIDE. O’Haire also went 0-4 as a kickboxer in K-1, suffering knockout losses to the likes of Gary Goodridge and Musashi. O’Haire’s knockout win against Frankie Parkman at a Champions Quest MMA event in December 2007 was the last time he fought professionally.

Since then, O’Haire has owned a barbershop in Hilton Head and was recently working as personal trainer at Exzel Fitness in Spartanburg. According to an obituary on Tributes.com, a Celebration of Life visitation will be held 1:00-3:00 p.m. Saturday, September 13th, 2014, at his home at 510 Hampton Drive, Spartanburg, SC 29306.

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Travis Browne vs. Brendan Schaub Added to UFC 181 in December


(I just went on Schaub’s twitter page to grab a recent photo of him. What I found…changed everything.)

UFC 181 (December 6th, Las Vegas) is already slated to feature Chris Weidman‘s middleweight title defense against Vitor Belfort, and a lightweight title fight between Anthony Pettis and Gilbert Melendez. If the UFC didn’t add a single other fight to this card, we would still begrudgingly hand over our money. (Don’t get any ideas, guys.) But luckily, a supporting bout between heavyweights Travis Browne and Brendan Schaub was just added today.

Browne most recently got his ass handed to him by Fabricio Werdum, who outstruck “Hapa” to a clear-cut unanimous decision victory at UFC on FOX 11 back in April. The loss snapped a streak of three consecutive first-round knockout wins for Browne, which he earned against Gabriel Gonzaga, Alistair Overeem, and Josh Barnett.

Schaub is coming off his own decision loss to Andrei Arlovski at UFC 174 in June — a fight so boring that they both should have lost. Before the Arlovski defeat, Schaub became the first UFC heavyweight to finish a fight by D’Arce choke, when he submitted Matt Mitrione at UFC 165.

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16 Semi-Related Thoughts About Race and Combat Sports


(Believe it or not, it’s possible for two black fighters to generate completely different reactions among MMA fans. / Photo via Getty)

UFC light heavyweight champion Jon Jones is arguably the most talented MMA fighter of all time, and has spent the last three-and-a-half years utterly dominating his weight class as 205-pound champion. Theoretically, fans should love this guy. And yet they don’t — a situation that is probably best explained by Jones’s odd shifts in personality, and a streak of regrettable behavior that never jibed well with his early choir-boy persona. But on yesterday’s edition of the Joe Rogan Experience podcast, UFC commentator Joe Rogan voiced an alternate theory:

I don’t know why Jon [Jones] is not more loved or popular than he is. I don’t understand it. In my opinion, I will never miss a Jon Jones fucking pay-per-view. I’ve heard people say, ‘Oh, he’s cocky. He’s this and [that].’ I wonder what the fuck is going on with that and I’m going to throw this out there, I’m just going to say it: I wonder how much of it is racism. I really do.

You know why? Because I think they look at him as this cocky black guy and I think a lot of people have an issue with that. I think that if he was a white guy and he was doing the same thing, a la a Chael Sonnen, I think he would be way more popular. Chael was never the successful athlete that Jon is, but I think Chael was way more successful as a promoter than Jon is. Jon has not been nearly as cocky or outwardly braggadocious as Chael was.

I just always found it odd when everybody would get upset at him and say that they didn’t like that ‘he’s cocky.’ He’s 25 and he’s the UFC’s light heavyweight champion. He’s the youngest ever UFC champion. He destroyed Shogun [Rua] to win the title and I mean destroyed. He threw a flying knee and hit Shogun in the chin five seconds into their fight. I mean, Jon Jones is a motherfucker. He’s a motherfucker, but for whatever reason people have had an issue with that. I know I’m going to get a bunch of hate tweets. ‘Fuck you and your fucking bullshit. What do you got? White guilt? Calling out racism?

I’m probably going to get an equal amount from ‘the Aryan race,’ mad at me for defending Jon Jones, ‘The cocky negro.’ I really think there’s something to that. I think people want a guy who is so physically gifted and young and brash and black and rich, they want him to have more humility or fake humility, as it were. I think Jon’s trying that a little bit and that’s one of the reasons Daniel Cormier was like, ‘You are so fake.’ Cormier was saying that to him because I think he’s trying to counteract how people feel about him.”

To claim that Jones would be more popular if he was white strikes me as a blatant oversimplification. Then again, to claim that race has no effect on how stars get made in MMA is laughable. Since Rogan has everyone talking about it today, I figured I’d share my own feelings about the intersection of race and combat sports, in no particular order…

1. There’s a reason why Rampage Jackson was beloved by fans in his prime, and Jon Jones never has been. The average Jon Jones-hater will claim that it has to do with “realness” or authenticity, but fans only respond to a particular type of realness. Rampage Jackson was a caricature of an intimidating black guy, and people seemed to love him for it.

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Following Fight Night 50 Barnburner, Joe Lauzon and Michael Chiesa Trade Barbs Online


(“Rematches are dumb. #ufcfightnight.” via Lauzon’s Instagram.)

Joe Lauzon vs. Michael Chiesa was as predictable as it was unexpected, if that makes any sense. Allow me to explain. The Fight Night 50 main card opener that pitted the TUF 5 alum against the TUF 15 winner was predictable in the way that all Joe Lauzon fights are: It was a back-and-forth, ferociously paced banger that brought the crowd to life from the very moment it started. There’s a reason why Lauzon has scored a UFC record 13 fight bonuses, and his most recent performance was no exception.

The fight’s ending was unexpected, however, in that Lauzon emerged victorious via TKO — something he hasn’t accomplished since 2008 — and that said TKO came due to the doctor’s intervention. As you might expect, Chiesa was upset with the decision and immediately took to Twitter to protest the stoppage while demanding an immediate rematch.

“Out of all the bloody three-round wars I’ve seen … Diego, Lauzon and many others, why the hell did they stop my fight?” asked Chiesa. “I was never beat, my will was never broken, I was winning that fight. I demand a rematch before the year ends. I hope you all were entertained, you guys got robbed as much as me. That fight was going to be a three-round war. We all got robbed.”

Lauzon responded shortly thereafter with the above Instagram post, showing that not only had all 3 judges had scored the first round for him, but stating his belief that “rematches are dumb.” That led to this exchange between the two lightweights on Twitter:

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Thiago Silva on Assault Charges and UFC Return: “People Will Forget. They Always Do.”


(Silva posts a message to fans after news of his UFC return is made public.)

By now, you’ve all likely heard the news that Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice was terminated by his team just hours after a new video surfaced showing him KO’ing his future wife during an argument in an elevator. The reaction to Rice’s termination has been equally celebrated and criticized, with many fans asking why it took visual confirmation (you know, besides the footage we had already seen of Rice dragging his wife out of said elevator) to prompt a decision that the Ravens should have already made. But still, the right thing had been done, so all’s well that ends well, right?

Cue Thiago Silva, a longstanding member of the UFC’s light heavyweight division whose career has been shrouded in controversy for years now. He falsified a urine sample following his fight at UFC 125, tested positive for marijuana just two fights later at UFC on FUEL 6, and failed to make weight two fights later at Fight Night 29. Most recently, Silva was arrested following an armed standoff with police in his Florida home, with accusations of everything from domestic assault to attempted murder being hurled at him by his ex-wife.

To say that Silva has become something of a liability to the UFC would be an understatement, but since all charges against him were recently dropped, many MMA fans are arguing that he deserves to continue making a living the only way he knows how. Dana White seemed to agree, stating upon Silva’s re-signing with the promotion that “He went through the legal process and came out of it untainted. He deserves to be able to make a living again. He’s back under contract.”

His place in the UFC restored, perhaps it’s time that we heard Silva’s side of the story, eh? Appearing on yesterday’s edition of The MMA Hour, Silva attempted to do just that:

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Stephan Bonnar, Justin McCully Admit to Pre-Planning Atrocious Bellator 123 “Brawl” [SHOCKED FACE]


(Bellator 131: Stubble. Will. Reign.)

I know it’s only Monday morning, but are you guys ready to have your f*cking minds blown?!! Because it turns out that, contrary to the opinions of almost everyone who witnessed it live, the super awesome Stephan Bonnar-Tito Ortiz brawl at Bellator 123 *might* have been pre-planned. I know, right? So sayeth Bonnar himself:

Listen @Lowkey1324, @titoortiz is a self absorbed ego maniac.The world needed 2 know.Tito, Coker, @BellatorMMA & @SpikeTV, didn’t know shit! It was all me & @JustinMcCully. If u wanna hate us 4 pulling a pro wrestling esque promo off while calling tito out on the BS he’s pulled on people over the years..Then by all means, go buy yourself some punishment gear, a front row ticket, and be sure to bring a rain coat, cuz things r gonna get bloody.

Well I don’t know about you guys, but I am shocked. Shocked I tells ya!! I could have sworn that cornrows rapist mask executioner mask guy was legitimately just there for moral support, and that Bonnar’s hi-larious Jenna Jameson jokes were ripped from the top of his dome, but now I feel cheated. Embarassed for the sport, even. So I say shame on you, Stephan Bonnar, for toying with our emotions so carelessly during an otherwise pleasant evening of fights. I can’t even look at you anymore, and it’s not just because you’re making that face again.

But I’m sure we’re all still wondering, whose idea was the f*cking rape mask? Well…

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