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Tag: Alex Caceres

Urijah Faber Off UFC Japan Card, Replaced By the Last Guy He Beat


(With a cleft like that, Glazer is committing borderline sexual harassment here. Photo via Faber’s instagram.)

Last week (or maybe earlier this week, I’ve been drinking a lot lately), we informed you that Urijah Faber had been booked to face some guy who threw his last opponent out of the ring at Fight Night 52: Hunt vs. Nelson (a.k.a “The Japan Card”). I think his name was Masupingpong Toyatasuzuki, but then again, I’m *incredibly* racist.

In any case, word broke earlier today that Faber has been forced out of said matchup with said guy who threw his last opponent out of the ring due to an undisclosed injury (lotta that going around lately). As luck would have it, the UFC quickly found an entertaining, if slightly less known fighter to replace Faber: TUF 12 alum Alex Caceres, a.k.a the last guy Faber beat. (This means that now would be a good time to set down the bong, Alex.)

Faber and Caceres met at UFC 175 in the always coveted prelim main event slot, with Faber emerging victorious by third round submission via Hulk arms. Shamalamadingdong, on the other hand, will be making his UFC debut, having finished his last six fights in a row before throwing that poor sonofabitch out of the ring. God, I wish there was a video available of that fight.

Predictions, please.

-J. Jones

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Weird Booking of the Day: Urijah Faber vs. Alex Caceres Added to UFC 175


(Be patient, this will make sense soon. / Image via @UrijahFaber)

In a booking that Bjorn Rebney might describe as a “weird, funky, freaky kind of Cirque du Soleil-esque type of fight,” #1-ranked bantamweight contender Urijah Faber will fight #13-ranked Alex “Bruce Leroy” Caceres at UFC 175: Weidman vs. Machida, July 5th in Las Vegas. The UFC announced the matchup yesterday.

The pairing came about after a fan suggested it to Caceres on twitter, Caceres said he was down, and then Faber responded two weeks later with the photoshop you see above, accompanied by the phrase “Sho Nuf!!” Seriously, that’s all it took for the UFC matchmakers to greenlight this one.

Look, I get it: Joe Silva and Sean Shelby are barely keeping their heads above water these days. Plus, after Faber lost his sixth-consecutive title bout in February — against Renan Barao at UFC 169 — he has officially entered the “just gimme some fun fights” stage of his career, and if nothing else, The California Kid vs. Bruce Leroy is a fun fight. I think. Right? And who knows, maybe Caceres will surprise us by rising to the occasion. After exposing Sergio Pettis in January, the TUF 12 vet proved that he’s not to be taken lightly.

More importantly, the UFC gets to add one of its biggest sub-155 stars to a pay-per-view that is already their most stacked card of the year by a wide margin. Mark your calendars for July 5th, and check out the current lineup after the jump…

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25 MMA Reaction GIFs for All Occasions


(Matt Hughes doesn’t need to say it. But yes, it’s whatever.)

Reaction GIFs are the world’s most perfect means of communication. Why waste time typing out actual words about how you’re feeling when you can just link to other people’s facial expressions? The next time you find yourself in a heated comments section, fire off one of these MMA-related reaction GIFs. Use the next page links to move through the list, and enjoy…

When you’ve defeated a bitter rival:

When you just laughed at something you shouldn’t have laughed at:

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Sergio Pettis vs. Alex Caceres Added to UFC on FOX 10 Card in January


(Photo by Jeff Bottari, via Getty)

After outpointing Will “The Thrill” Campuzano last month at UFC 167, undefeated bantamweight prodigy Sergio Pettis has been quickly booked for his second Octagon appearance — which will take place just ten weeks after his UFC debut. As first reported by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Pettis will compete at UFC on FOX 10: Henderson vs. Thomson (January 25th, Chicago) against Alex Caceres.

Though Caceres first became known for his wacky “Bruce Leroy” persona on TUF 12, the Miami-based former yard-fighter has developed into one of the most durable mid-level contenders in the UFC bantamweight division. If not for his weed-related no-contest earlier this year, Caceres would currently be on a three-fight win streak, with all wins by split-decision. (Four of Caceres’s last five fights ended in split-decision, which I guess makes him the Leonard Garcia of his generation.)

Pettis vs. Caceres becomes the 12th fight added to the Bendo vs. Punk card card — which also includes such notable scraps as Gonzaga vs. Miocic, Cerrone vs. Martins, and Rosholt vs. Oliynyk — though its exact placement on the lineup has yet to be announced. Shoot your predictions in the comments section, and swing by Fightland to read about the time Caceres trained with the real Bruce Leroy before his UFC debut, which turned out to be a terrible decision on every level.

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Lavar Johnson Fired Following UFC 157 Drug Test; ‘Big’ Admits to Undergoing Testosterone Replacement Therapy


(“HYPOGONADISM BITCH, ALL DAY!” / Photo via Esther Lin @ MMAFighting)

Though his job appeared to be safe following his UFC 157 decision loss to Brendan Schaub, pissing dirty for steroids turned out to be the kiss of death for heavyweight Lavar “Big” Johnson. In light of his failed drug test, Johnson has been cut by the UFC. In addition, the California State Athletic Commission has hit him with a nine-month suspension, as well as a fine of “around $1,250″ that reflects the cost of the two tests the CSAC used for his drug screening.

MMAJunkie adds some more surprising details about what led to Johnson’s PED bust:

An elevated testestosterone-to-epitestosterone (T/E) ratio of 6.6-to-1 triggered a carbon isotope ratio (CIR) test that confirmed Johnson had testosterone in his system that was “was consistent with the administration of a steroid.” Johnson, though, admitted he was undergoing testosterone replacement therapy in a recent conversation with the California State Athletic Commission, which oversaw the Feb. 23 pay-per-view event at Honda Center in Anaheim, Calif., and suspended him based on the results of his test. Johnson failed to disclose TRT on a pre-fight medical questionnaire. A rep for AKA said the fighter may seek an exemption for the treatment.

Here’s how you know TRT is nothing more than a bullshit cheating-method — when a dude who looks like this claims to need it, and then avoids mentioning it during his pre-fight medicals. Ah well. You can’t say the UFC didn’t warn you. In other UFC drug-bust aftermath news…

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‘UFC on FUEL 8′ Drug Tests Nail Alex Caceres (Marijuana) and Riki Fukuda (Stimulants)


(Alex asks that you respect his privacy at this time, and would like to state for the record that Cool Ranch Doritos Locos Tacos were originally his idea. / Photo via MMAWeekly)

And the hits just keep coming, folks. In the immediate wake of Lavar Johnson’s apparent steroid bust after UFC 157, two more fighters have been flagged for failed drug tests following their performances at UFC on FUEL 8: Silva vs. Stann. With no regulating body in place, UFC officials oversaw the testing of fighters at the March 3rd event in Saitama, Japan.

First up on the naughty list is Alex “Bruce Leroy” Caceres, who tested positive for marijuana metabolites after his split-decision win over Kyung Ho Kang during the UFC on FUEL 8 prelims. Caceres will be suspended six months, and must attend drug rehabilitation classes and pass a drug test before he’s allowed to return. Furthermore, his victory over Kang — which would have been his third-straight in the UFC — has been changed to a no-contest. Caceres joins Matt Riddle, Thiago Silva, Dave Herman, Nick Diaz, and Nick Diaz’s friends in the growing list of publicly-outed potheads.

Also caught in the latest drug-sweep was Japanese middleweight Riki Fukuda, who lost a decision to Brad Tavares on the night in question. According to MMAJunkie, Fukuda tested positive for the banned stimulants phenylpropanolamine (never heard of it), norpseudoephedrine (never heard of it), and ephedrine (love that stuff). Sadly, Fukuda isn’t getting off with a suspension — he’s already been released by the UFC. The loss to Tavares dropped Fukuda’s Octagon record to 2-3, with all fights going the distance.

Damn…steroids, weed, and uppers in the same day — or as we like to call it, “The Tijuana Triathlon.” Get your shit together, UFC fighters.

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CagePotato Databomb #6: Breaking Down the UFC Bantamweights by Striking Performance


(Click chart for full-size versionFor previous Databombs, click here.)

By Reed Kuhn, @Fightnomics

It’s almost time for the interim bantamweight championship fight between Renan Barao and Michael McDonald. But first, let’s examine the whole UFC bantamweight division in several key striking metrics. As one of the youngest divisions with quite a few newcomers, there were several chart busters who have performed either really well in a certain metric, or in Mike Easton’s case, really poorly, so those outliers are noted. Usually those fighters will regress towards the mean, but they’re worth keeping an eye on. A full explanation of the chart and variables is included at the end of this post.

As a group, the 135’ers are the hardest to hit, as illustrated by their lowest power head striking accuracy of any UFC division. But they manage to maintain a high pace of action, with the second-highest significant strike attempts per minute average. (Flyweights have the highest.) So which fighters get the awards in this frenzied group?

The Winners

Sniper Award: Rangy southpaw Alex Caceres leads the division with 48% power head striking accuracy. Though he has yet to score a knockdown in the UFC, the Bruce Lee superfan has definitely put on entertaining fights including sharp striking, rapid pace, and some very retro body suits.

Energizer Bunny Award: Johnny Bedford has been outstriking his UFC opponents more than 2:1 on his way to two finishes. Bedford’s size has been an advantage for him in one of the smallest weight classes, and we’ll see if he can continue his streak.

Biggest Ball(s) Award: In addition to outworking his opponents, double award winner Johnny Bedford is 2-0 in the UFC with two knockout finishes. But an honorable mention also goes to knockout machine Michael “Mayday” McDonald, who has landed four knockdowns during his 5-0 streak with Zuffa. McDonald gets his biggest test yet against higher volume striker and interim champ Renan Barao, in an interesting contrast of power and finesse.

The Losers

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Wanderlei Silva vs. Brian Stann Confirmed for ‘UFC on FUEL 8′ Headliner, Diego Sanchez Returns to Lightweight vs. Takanori Gomi


(“Yeah, I have a question for the group: Is anybody *not* getting too old for this shit?” / Photo via Sherdog)

A pair of former PRIDE champions will be anchoring the UFC’s return to Japan. As confirmed by the promotion yesterday, UFC on FUEL 8 is slated for Sunday, March 3rd, at the Saitama Super Arena, with Wanderlei Silva vs. Brian Stann booked for the main event. [Update: The fight will take place at light-heavyweight.] Both men are coming off of decision losses, with Silva dropping his rematch to Rich Franklin at UFC 147 in June, and Stann losing to Michael Bisping in September.

Though Silva probably has little recollection of the last time he competed in Saitama, the Axe Murderer became an MMA superstar in Japan, where he went undefeated through his first 20 fights in PRIDE and held the middleweight title for over five years. But his current stint in the UFC — where he’s won just three of eight fights since 2007 — has suggested that Silva is nearing the end of the road, and his next bad loss could be his last. Can he come up with another heroic effort against the All American?

Speaking of PRIDE legends, longtime lightweight champ Takanori Gomi will be welcoming Diego Sanchez back to the lightweight division at UFC on FUEL 8. Gomi has won his last two UFC fights against Eiji Mitsuoka and Mac Danzig, while Sanchez is coming off a decision defeat against Jake Ellenberger in February. Sanchez hasn’t competed at 155 pounds since being utterly shredded by BJ Penn during their lightweight title fight three years ago.

Pretty damn good for a free card, right? Keep in mind that the event will also feature the heavyweight battle between Mark Hunt and Stefan Struve, plus the following newly-announced supporting bouts…

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UFC on FUEL: Munoz vs. Weidman Aftermath — Baby, You’re a Star


(A replay of Weidman’s incredible standing elbow and the savage ground-and-pound finish, via fueltv.)

With so many contenders clogging up the upper echelon of the UFC middleweight division — all with their hands out for a title shotChris Weidman had to do something extra special to get noticed in his fight against Mark Munoz last night. Because let’s face it: Until now, his name wasn’t setting off alarm bells with many casual fans. Sure, the Serra-Longo-bred wrestler/grappler was 4-0 in the UFC, but his personality wasn’t “colorful” enough to create hype around his fights (à la master salesmen Sonnen, Bisping, Mayhem), and if your most impressive performance in the Octagon is a submission win over Tom Lawlor, you still have a long way to go, right?

So this is how you make your name in the UFC. Step 1) Utterly dominate an opponent who was himself thought to be one of the next challengers to the middleweight title. Step 2) Finish the fight in a way that immediately clinches a spot on future “Best Knockouts of 2012″ lists, both for its technical brilliance (the Spider-esque timing of that standing elbow!) and for its hard-to-watch brutality (uh, you gonna stop this one any time soon, Josh?). Step 3) Call out Anderson Silva after the fight — hell, go ahead and say you can submit him — just four days after Silva re-cemented himself as the most untouchable 185′er in MMA history.

And so, a main event that was not officially a #1 contender’s match might turn out to be one after all. Sure, there are bigger names than Weidman in the title hunt — and maybe he’ll have to fight somebody like Alan Belcher or the Lombard/Boetsch winner before he gets the opportunity — but no matter what the future holds for him, Chris Weidman is a star now. In one fight, he went from being a semi-anonymous contender to the name on every UFC fan’s lips.

Meanwhile, Mark Munoz drops down the ladder where hungry middleweight up-and-comers like Constantinos Philippou and Francis Carmont are on their own heat-seeking paths to contendership. In other words, the UFC middleweight division has never been deeper and more exciting — which makes it the worst possible time to take a high-profile loss, especially one in which you weren’t competitive for a single moment of the fight. We haven’t seen the last of the Filipino Wrecking Machine by any means, but it’s going to take him a long time to claw his way back to where he was before Wednesday night.

In other news…

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[VIDEO] UFC 144 Danavlog #1

You know the deal by now, Potato Nation. Dana White’s first video blog for UFC 144 takes a look back at the aftermath of UFC 143, as has become the norm. So we’re going to skip the fancy introduction and get right into it.

(1:43) -  Matt Riddle has to be one of the nicest guys in the UFC, bar none. Talk about a guy that loves his job. And a metaphorical fist bump is due to Henry Martinez for putting on a hell of a fight on such short notice. DW states that he originally thought this match-up was “the worst mismatch in UFC History.” How quickly we all forgot Silva/Leites.

(2:36) - Poor Edwin Figueroa‘s testicles.

(2:44) - Apparently Bruce Leroy kicked Figueroa so hard in the balls that he forgot how many times he kicked Figueroa in the balls. Irony? Either way, we agree that a two point deduction seemed a little harsh. Then again, Caceres likely destroyed any of Figueroa’s future plans to have children, so we’ll call it even.

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