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Tag: Demetrious Johnson

Here Comes a New Challenger: Matches to Make — UFC 186


(We’re really, really, *really* missing that Xbox sponsorship right now. via Getty.)

By Sam Stilson

Aside from escaping a fire, it’s never a good thing when the audience starts leaving halfway through the main event of a card. It’s an even worse thing when you’ve already had to close off half the arena just to fill the building. No, UFC  186 was not a successful PPV for the world’s premier MMA organization, but despite its many, many failings, it wasn’t a half-bad display of mixed martial arts…for Bellator, or WSOF, of even a Fight Pass show.

Still the fights went on, winners were crowned and with this trainwreck behind us, we must now wonder where do they go from here?

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UFC 186 Highlights/Results: Johnson Subs Horiguchi at the Bell, Rampage Underwhelms in Return, + More


(All clips via UFC on FOX.)

Not that you care right now, what with Jon Jones’ hit-and-run currently capturing your attention, but there was a UFC event over the weekend that on paper looked pretty crappy but in reality turned out to be pretty fun affair (and not just because I went 10-2 on my fight picks for the second time in the past three events).

UFC 186: Johnson vs. Horiguchi, it was called, and true to form, it was a card absolutely ravaged by injuries. Dillashaw, Barao, Rory Mac, Lombard, Trujillo — all were expected to fight on Saturday, but the MMA Gods had other plans. Instead, we were treated to the (underwhelming) return of Rampage Jackson thanks to a last-minute appeal of the injunction that originally forced him off the card, the arrival of Thomas Almeida, and the continued dominance of Mighty Mouse.

In the main event of the evening, Demetrious Johnson had his way with #7 ranked (and +1000 underdog) Kyoji Horiguchi for five straight rounds. It was very much a typical Johnson performance in many regards, in that it was damn near flawless, capped off by a late submission (the latest ever, actually), and all but ignored by the fans in the Belle Center. Little guys just don’t get no respect, nawmsayin?

Check out the highlights from the entire UFC 186 main card and a full list of results after the jump. 

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UFC 186 Loses TJ Dillashaw, And Therefore All Fan Interest, to Rib Injury


(WHAT ARE YOU SMILING AT, TJ? CAN’T YOU SEE THAT *WE’RE* THE ONES IN REAL PAIN?!! via Getty.)

Perhaps the most shocking thing about UFC 185 was not the pair of title fight upsets that occurred that night, but that all of the fighters competing in said title fights even managed to make it to fight night at all. There aren’t many injury-free fighters like Jeremy Horn these days, to the point that the UFC is forced to abandon plans for a card containing just one title fight more often than not, or just cancel the card altogether. With UFC 186, they were attempting to do the impossible again, booking both the TJ Dillashaw-Renan Barao bantamweight title fight rematch and a flyweight bout between champion Demetrious Johnson and Kyro…Kyjo…some other guy.

What I’m saying is, we probably shouldn’t be that surprised to learn that one of those 2 title fights (the one we were interested in, more specifically) will no longer be happening.

Details after the jump. 

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UFC Still Hasn’t Informed Its Champions How Much They’ll Make (Or Lose) From Reebok Sponsorship


(RIP, @XBOX mouthpiece. / Screencap via MMATKO)

When the UFC and Reebok announced their six-year uniform agreement at the beginning of this month, we could only speculate at how good or bad this would be for the UFC’s fighters, based on the few details that were available. The reported “tier system,” of paying fighters according to their official media rankings (LOL, SMDH) was still a mystery, in terms of how exactly the pie would be divvied up.

But of course, CagePotato is just a mid-level MMA blog trying to find its way in this world with zero access to Zuffa executives. The crazy part is, the UFC’s own stars are still in dark about what the sponsorship agreement will mean for their finances, two weeks after the announcement was first made.

Case in point: MMAJunkie published an interview with Demetrious Johnson yesterday, in which the long-reigning flyweight champion wondered aloud what the UFC’s new sponsorship landscape will mean for his existing sponsorship with Xbox, which is now basically deceased; Johnson will not be able to wear Xbox logos in the Octagon when the UFC/Reebox partnership officially kicks in next year. Johnson’s comments were somewhat shocking, because it seems like he knows as little about the Reebok deal’s specifics as we do. Here are some choice quotes…

A guy like Nick Diaz, for example, comes out with all his Metal Mulisha, all his sponsorships,” Johnson said. “Let’s say from those sponsorships he makes like $80,000 to go in the octagon. That’s a nice payday just for wearing sponsorships.

“Lets say the UFC says, ‘Hey man, you’ve got to wear Reebok tomorrow.’ And he says, ‘OK, that sounds good. Here are all my pay stubs and my contracts for my last fight. They’re paying me $80,000, so what’s Reebok going to pay me?’ They say, ‘You’re ranked second in the world, so we’re going to pay you $2,000 to wear Reebok.’ For me, I think that’s not necessarily fair because there’s basically $78,000 that’s unaccounted for. If UFC’s going to compensate me with the same amount, that’s fantastic. If not, that’s a big boo-boo”…

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VIDEO: CagePotato.com Appears on TYT Sports to Discuss Demetrious Johnson vs. Chris Cariaso Fight at UFC 178

The classy dudes at TYT Sports were kind enough to have me on their show this morning to discuss the top three fights at UFC 178. First up, this breakdown of the main event, Demetrious Johnson vs. Chris Cariaso.

I haven’t watched the video yet because I don’t like looking at my own face or hearing the sound of my own voice, but I definitely remember what we talked about. Basically, I ran down the lopsided two-round beating that Johnson gave Cariaso, why Mighty Mouse’s performance was impressive and not impressive at the same time, and why staying in the flyweight division might not be in Johnson’s best interest, career-wise.

Give it a look, and please subscribe to TYT Sports on YouTube for more UFC 178 analysis videos from yours truly, which will be posted by this evening.

(BG)

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UFC 178 Salaries: McGregor, Johnson, Cruz Are Well-Compensated for Their Time


(Dominick Cruz made $2,459.02 per second for his 61-second destruction of Takeya Mizugaki. / Photo via Getty)

The UFC paid out $1,433,000 in disclosed salaries and bonuses to the 22 fighters who competed at UFC 178, with seven of those fighters comfortably landing in six-figure territory. Leading the list is — you guessed it — Conor McGregor, who tacked on $125,000 in bonuses to his already respectable show-money, for a grand total of 200 large. The second-biggest check went to UFC flyweight champion Demetrious Johnson, who gets paid under a quirky “$129k to show, $54k to win” arrangement.

The full list of disclosed payouts is below, along with our usual underpaid/overpaid picks. Note that these figures do not include additional revenue from sponsorships, undisclosed “locker room bonuses,” or percentages of pay-per-view revenue that certain UFC stars are entitled to.

Demetrious Johnson: $183,000 (includes $54,000 win bonus)
Chris Cariaso: $24,000

Donald Cerrone: $126,000 (includes $63,000 win bonus)
Eddie Alvarez: $100,000

Conor McGregor: $200,000 (includes $75,000 win bonus, $50,000 Performance of the Night bonus.)
Dustin Poirier: $34,000

Yoel Romero: $108,000 (includes $29,000 win bonus, $50,000 Fight of the Night bonus)
Tim Kennedy: $120,000 (includes $50,000 Fight of the Night bonus)

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Conor McGregor vs. Dustin Poirier: Actual Full Fight Video Highlights

Remember last week when we went apeshit over MMA sites purporting to have full-fight video highlights but not actually delivering?

In case you don’t remember, loads of site posted “full fight video highlights” of the fight between Mark Hunt and Roy Nelson. The only problem was the highlights were missing the most important part: The knockout.

The highlight video above is much better. While it cuts away right before the fight is stopped, it shows just enough of Conor McGregor‘s first-round KO of Dustin Poirier for you to get the idea of how it went down.

And do you know what else is awesome? Pretty much all the other “full fight video highlights” from UFC 178 are the same. They actually show the parts you want to see. Chalk up another victory for the Potato Nation. It seems our irreverence is finally starting to make a difference in the world of MMA SEO clickbaiting.

Watch the other highlights after the jump, and be sure to enjoy your 40-seconds of violence and anodyne commentary!

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UFC 178 Results: Dispelling the “Lighter Weight Classes Can’t Draw” Myth


(Photo via Getty)

By Matt Saccaro

The notion that lighter weight fighters have drawing power as little as their size is among the most oft-touted truisms in MMA.

When given a cursory glance, it appears true. Demetrious Johnson is responsible for one of the worst UFC PPV buyrates of all time at UFC 174. People were so disinterested they literally walked out of the arena during Johnson’s world title fight against Ali Bagautinov.

Johnson (and perhaps flyweight in general) lacking buzz isn’t new. He headlined UFC on Fox 8 in Seattle and drew a paltry live gate of $735,000. When the UFC ran the city the year prior, the live gate and attendance were twice as high. And the ratings for UFC on Fox 8? It was 40% lower than UFC on Fox 7 at 2.04 million–a record low at the time.

Flyweights debuted in the UFC in March 2012. When flyweights–to use a loaded cliche– failed to move the needle, proponents of the division said to just give it time. Fans would be wowed by the action and speed in flyweight fights. It’s September 2014 now and the weight class is just as devoid of interest as it ever was.

However, that doesn’t necessarily mean lighter weight classes can’t draw. It just means Demetrious Johnson (and much of the current stable of lighter weight fighters) can’t draw.

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UFC 178 Results: Johnson Submits Cariaso, Cerrone Out-Points Alvarez, McGregor Flattens Poirier


(Look, if the UFC isn’t promoting the main event, then we won’t either. / Photo via Getty)

UFC 178: Johnson vs. Cariaso is underway in Las Vegas, featuring an utterly stacked lineup of crowd-friendly fight-finishers (see esp.: Donald Cerrone vs. Eddie Alvarez), brilliant self-promoters (Conor McGregor!), eccentric Cuban wrestlers (Yoel Romero), and people who we just haven’t seen in a long time (Dominick Cruz, Cat Zingano). And oh yeah — a flyweight title fight. It should be a wild ride from top to bottom, and we’re psyched about it.

Our man Alex Giardini we’ll be giving you round-by-round results from the UFC 178 pay-per-view card after the jump starting at 10 p.m. ET / 7 p.m. PT. Refresh the page every few minutes for all the latest, and follow us on Twitter for bonus commentary. Thanks for being here.

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The 17 Greatest Quotes From ‘Countdown to UFC 178′

Irish featherweight Conor McGregor is unquestionably the best talker in the UFC. That’s an indisputable truth in the post-Chael era, and it becomes even more apparent when you watch McGregor’s segment of the new “Countdown to UFC 178″ preview special. But it turns out that new lightweight acquisition Eddie Alvarez is a quote factory himself, so we decided to pick out his (and the other featured fighters’) best lines from the show, for your education and enjoyment.

Videos and quotes continue after the jump. UFC 178: Johnson vs. Cariaso goes down this Saturday in Las Vegas. Get pumped.

*****

“Although fans might not know who I am, I’m willing to bet every fighter in this division knows who I am.” — Eddie Alvarez

“There’s a lot of really talented guys at 155, whether it’s jiu-jitsu, really talented wrestlers, really talented strikers. But then there’s fighters. That’s what I’m good at. There’s no one better at giving damage and taking damage than myself.” — Alvarez

“I used to wonder why I always do all these crazy things, like what’s the purpose? Why do I want to jump off buildings and swing from ropes and ride four-wheelers and wakeboarding and do everything crazy? ‘Cause it gives you this feeling, like this scared feeling, you know? That same feeling is the same feeling you get right before you walk out to a cage. I’m searching for that feeling and there it is, every time I fight, it’s like the scariest feeling in the entire world.” — Donald “Cowboy” Cerrone

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