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Tag: Don Frye

The Greatest Fights in MMA History Tournament: And the Winner Is…

Was there ever any doubt?

After four ferocious rounds of voting, we are pleased to announce that Don Frye vs. Yoshihiro Takayama (PRIDE 21, 6/23/02) has earned the title of Greatest Fight in MMA History! Frye vs. Takayama whipped Dan Henderson vs. Mauricio “Shogun” Rua 1 in the tournament finals, taking a full 68% of the vote. Along the way, the classic brawl beat out Fedor Emelianenko vs. Mirko Cro Cop, Kazushi Sakuraba vs. Royce Gracie 1, and Anderson Silva vs. Chael Sonnen 1 — not an easy path through the bracket, but Frye/Takayama made it look easy.

In honor of this momentous occasion, check out the Don Frye vs. Yoshihiro Takayama fight video above and the Don Frye quote-reel below. Thanks to everybody who voted, and if you have any ideas for future bracket features on CagePotato, let us know in the comments section!

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The Greatest Fights in MMA History Tournament: Vote Now in the Finals!

It all comes down to this. The semifinal round of our Greatest Fights in MMA History Tournament is in the books, and two finalists have emerged after a pair of close battles…

- Dan Henderson vs. Mauricio “Shogun” Rua 1 defeated Forrest Griffin vs. Stephan Bonnar 1, with 55.6% of the vote. And so, a recent epic replaces an older one in the pantheon of all-time great MMA fights. Had to happen eventually.

- Don Frye vs. Yoshihiro Takayama defeated Anderson Silva vs. Chael Sonnen 1, with 52.8% of the vote. I’m surprised it was this close. Kudos to Silva vs. Sonnen 1 for making it competitive, and for their scrappy underdog run in this tournament overall.

So which fight deserves to call itself The Greatest Fight in MMA History — Henderson vs. Rua 1 or Frye vs. Takayama? Vote now, and come back on Wednesday when we reveal the winner!

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Non-MMA Video of the Day: Epic Semi-Pro Hockey Brawl Ends in Bro Fives and Hugs

It’s a real shame that most hockey fans unfamiliar with MMA might never know that the greatest hockey brawl of all time actually took place during an MMA fight. No, not Bosse vs. Alexander, I’m talking about Frye vs. Takayama.

Frye vs. Takayama is the kind of epic, go-for-broke brawl that transcends all sports, really — the kind of fight that threw away technique, common sense, and any semblance of a gameplan and simply boiled down to pure machismo and who had more of it (Frye, obviously). And on Saturday night, hockey finally got its Frye vs. Takayama, in the form of a brawl between Joel Theriault and Gaby Roch that took place during a Quebec-based LNAH semi-pro game.

The feeling out process lasts approximately 5 seconds before Theriault and Roch clinch up and start unloading bombs on one another. Clearly not having read my column on MMA moves that would serve well in a hockey fight, neither player opts for a guillotine choke or Muay Thai plum, but even more incredible than Theriault and Roch’s grit and unbreakable chins is what they do once the refs finally step in. First they high-five, then they hug.

It’s one of those rare, truly beautiful moments that cannot even be ruined by the presence of Five Finger Death Punch’s music blaring in the background. Because, as the classic Mr. Show “I’ll marry your stupid ass” sketch has taught us, there’s a mutual respect to be found when someone realizes that the person they are quarreling with is as much a badass as they believe themselves to be. And hopefully, this fight will help bridge the gap between hockey and MMA fans for years to come.

-J. Jones

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“It’s a Step in the Right Direction for Men”: Don Frye and Other MMA Stars React to Hip Show [VIDEO]


(Props: MMAInsidetheCageTV)

Our old friends Casey Oxendine and Cyrus Fees were at the Arnold Classic last weekend, giving a bunch of MMA stars their first look at Hip Show, the 2-on-2 Russian MMA league that we’ll be sponsoring for its AXS TV debut on March 14th. Aside from Bobby Lashley stating the obvious (“Man, somebody’s gonna die”), everybody was super-positive about it. Some notable quotes…

Mark Coleman: “I wish was 20 years younger, it seems I’d fit right in on what we got goin’ here.”

Don Frye: ”Obviously the Russians have to invent something this fantastic. It’s a step in the right direction for men.”

Lyoto Machida: “I don’t know…it looks crazy, no? But I can try it, just for training maybe.”

Bobby Lashley: ”Have you seen the movie Running Man? This is one step away from there.”

Urijah Faber: “That’s awesome. I can’t wait to watch it.” (Chad Mendes then suggests he and Urijah would “wreck shop” as a 145-pound Hip Show team.)

Ryan Bader: “That’s pretty crazy. I would watch it definitely…I think it would be pretty fun if you had a good partner. [I would choose] Weidman, we’d tag-team some guys over here.”

Shonie Carter: “I got some homies over in the hood off the West Side of Chicago that would love to do this…I’m doin’ this, son. I’m doin’ this. I’m just sayin’. That shit right here? That’s gonna be me.”

When Hip Show comes to the U.S., I’m putting my money on Shonie Carter & West Side Homie TBA. Tune in to AXS TV tonight at 9 p.m. to see Casey and Cyrus discuss Hip Show on Inside MMA, and be sure to watch the best-of special next Friday, March 14th!

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CagePotato Roundtable #31: What Was the Greatest One-Round Fight of All Time?


(Don’t worry, this is the only time you’ll be seeing this guy on the list.)

With three of the fights on UFC 170‘s main card ending in the first round, the CagePotato.com staff has decided to revisit the greatest one-round fights in MMA history during today’s CagePotato Roundtable. Despite their brevity, these fights were memorable enough to be worthy of any discussion on the greatest fights in MMA history. Read on for our picks, and please continue to send your ideas for future roundtable discussion topics to tips@cagepotato.com

Nathan Smith


(Photo courtesy of MiddleEasy.com)

Greatest fight that only went one round, you say? Psh, please. How about a fight that had more total strikes thrown in the first 30+ seconds than in the entire multi-year relationship between that (piece of crap) Ike Turner and Tina? Ok, ok, maybe not that many but Don Frye vs. Yoshihiro Takayama still resulted in a shit load of punches. So, to all the other contributors to this RoundTable, I respect your opinions but much like the original Highlander – There can be only one – your choices are all The Kurgan (and he was “the hardest screw that ever walked a turn at Shawshank State Prison” mind you, so you can take solace in that you losers).

After a multitude of viewings, according to my bloodshot eyes and my bourbon breath, there were 91 total strikes thrown by both Don Frye and Yoshirho Yamasaka in the opening 34 seconds of their epic collision way back at Pride 21 in June of 2002. True, I am not Reed Kuhn and these figures are not exact like a Cagepotato Databomb but let those punch-stats sink in. For a little more than half a minute, almost 3 strikes were thrown per second with almost ALL of them landing.

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[VIDEO] Don Frye is Back With More Machismo-Fueled Predictions for UFC 169

Don Frye told us that he’d be back after his UFC 168 installment of “Predator’s Predictions”, and since the only lie he ever told was that he’d call your mother the next day, “The Predator” has returned with UFC 169 in his crosshairs this time around.

What’s that, you say? There’s actually a different UFC event going down this weekend on Fox? THE PREDATOR HAS NOT THE TIME FOR YOUR MIDDLING CABLE TV CARDS. And if you don’t like how he does business, he’s sure there’s a Designing Women marathon with your name on it playing somewhere, bud.

After opening up this edition of “Predator’s Predictions” by alienating his dissenters as pathetic girlie-men and thanking Seth Macfarlane for bringing back Brian on Family Guy, Frye launches right into his usual mix of whiskey-soaked predictions and occasionally misogynistic insights. A few highlights:

-On Dominick Cruz’s latest injury: “I didn’t know Cruz had a groin.”
-On Ali Bagautinov: “Ali…Boobanov. He’s like the Tazmanian Devil on crack.”
-On Ricardo Lamas: “I remember Lorenzo from the hit TV show Renegade 17 years ago.”
--On Ricardo Lamas, again: ”You say that your favorite technique is ‘whatever wins me the fight.’ In your fight against Jose Aldo, I might recommend a baseball bat or a gun.”
--On Renan Barao: “He looks like Veeter Belfort’s mini-me.”

If your voice doesn’t drop three octaves after watching this video, you’re either a eunuch or already dead.

-J. Jones 

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Here’s Don Frye Drinking Whiskey and Making UFC 168 Predictions, Because Holidays [VIDEO]

On the off chance you didn’t get everything you wanted for Christmas this year, here’s a video of everything you could ever want for Christmas any year: Don Frye, Don Frye’s mustache, whiskey, a hot chick, and UFC 168 predictions. My chest hair grew three sizes just watching this video.

I can think of no greater gift to bestow upon you Taters this year, so merry (belated) Christmas, you sons a bitches.

-J. Jones

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MMA Fighters Transitioning to Pro-Wrestling: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly


(Let me guess, it’ll sound something like “Tito Ortiz, The Huntington Bad Beach Boy: Future NTA world TNA heavyweight champion of the world.” Capture via ProWresBlog.Blogspot.Com.)

For some MMA fighters, professional wrestling was just a one-time cash grab. For others, it became a second career. Inspired by yet another week of TNA Impact Wrestling’s efforts to get anyone to care about the professional wrestling experiments of two broken-down MMA legends, we’ll be examining fighters who took up professional wrestling after they made their names in MMA in our newest installment of The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly.

Bear in mind that this article is focusing on mixed martial artists who transitioned to professional wrestling careers, and not fighters who started off as professional wrestlers. So that means fighters like Brock Lesnar, Ken Shamrock, Bobby Lashley, Giant Silva, Bob Sapp, Dos Caras Jr. (aka Alberto Del Rio), Dan Severn (Google it) and Sakuraba will not be covered here — although a few of these men will make appearances in this article. Let’s start off on a positive note…

The Good

The Professional Wrestling Career of Josh Barnett.

When you’re thinking of good instances of an MMA fighter turning to professional wrestling as a second career choice, Josh Barnett should immediately come to mind. There have been other fighters who dabbled in professional wrestling, but Barnett is one of the only ones to be just as popular and successful in it as he was in MMA.

Before his transition, Barnett became the youngest heavyweight champion in UFC history by defeating Randy Couture at UFC 36. After being stripped of his title due to a positive drug test, Barnett set his sights on the Japanese professional wrestling scene, where the fans value legitimacy and toughness from their wrestlers more than mic skills and charisma (although Barnett has both in spades). He immediately challenged for the IWGP Heavyweight Championship, and although he came up short, he went on to enjoy the most relevant crossover career of any fighter on this list before his return to the UFC earlier this year put a halt to the wrasslin’ for the time being.

It’d be easy to call his work with the incredibly underrated Perry Saturn or the technical wrestling clinic that he put on against Hideki Suzuki his most impressive stuff, but it’s probably not. Honest to God, Barnett’s biggest accomplishment may be the fact that he managed to pull Bob Sapp — who has the same cardio and technique in wrestling as he does in MMA — through a watchable match. How many people can claim that?

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CagePotato Presents: MMA Impressions, With Jade Bryce [VIDEO]


(Props: YouTube.com/CagePotato. Please subscribe!)

Jade Bryce was our favorite MMA ring girl even before she agreed to do this video with us. Now, she’s officially reached CagePotato Hall of Fame status.

Watch as the Bellator beauty does her most faithful renditions of Rashad Evans‘s infamous knockout face, “Just Bleed” guy, drunk dancing mom at UFC 150, Ryan Jimmo‘s celebratory robot, “Rising Douchebag,” and the nose-smushing face-off between Don Frye and James Thompson at PRIDE 34. We had a blast putting this together, and we hope you enjoy it too.

Follow Jade on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, and keep an eye out for her new website, coming soon. And if you want to see a sequel to “MMA Impressions With Jade Bryce,” please throw some impression-suggestions into the comments section…

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Meanwhile, in Professional Wrestling: Don Frye and Yoshihiro Takayama Have Sloppy, Kayfabe Rematch [VIDEO]


(Props: MiddleEasy)

I’ll get this out of the way up front: I’m not exactly a fan of remakes. Attempting to improve something that most people think is fine as-is usually results in the creation of something indefensibly stupid (like that 2002 remake of Rollerball) that will make everyone feel terrible about themselves (like how anyone who paid to watch that 2002 remake of Rollerball felt). This is especially true when the people remaking something completely miss the point of what they’re remaking, and decide to take out all the parts with social commentary and replace them with explosions and sideboob (You get the point).

So I guess it goes without saying that when All Japan Pro Wrestling attempted to recreate Don Frye and Yoshihiro Takayama’s PRIDE 21 encounter during a professional wrestling match last Sunday, I wasn’t exactly a fan. The fact that it happened during a tag team match also featuring Masayuki Kono and Keiji Mutoh didn’t exactly help things for me. Two things before we go any further – yes, fellow wrestling nerds, Keiji Mutoh used to be The Great Muta and no, I didn’t know he was still alive, either.

Video awaits after the jump.

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