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Tag: Fight Flicks

The Trailer For the Next Great MMA Movie, Brutal, Features WWE-Style Clotheslines, Eye-Gouging, and Exposed Bones


(FAAAAAAAALCON PUNNNNNNNNNCH!!)

Let’s face it, there will probably never be a truly great “MMA” movie. Quote unquote “movie-going audiences” (and therefore, the studios that fund these films) don’t give two shits about accurately representing the sport, nor do they care to explore any aspect of MMA other than the fighting itself. To these people, MMA is a spectacle in need of exploiting: take your Karate Kid premise, switch out Ralph Macchio for a couple greased up Abercrombie models, and throw in as many Superman punches as humanly possible. Cut. Print. Never Back Down

Whether its because the filmmakers involved in these movies simply lack any understanding of what mixed martial arts actually is, or because the sport has a tendency to attract the type of dude-bro, mouth-breathing clods that helped make Transformers 4 a success, MMA in film is all but destined to a life of insultingly misrepresentative, focus-grouped tripe like Here Comes the Boom and Hector Echavarria straight-to-DVDs starring actual mixed martial artists. I honestly don’t know which is worse. 

And then, there’s Brutal, an upcoming MMA movie that appears to be equal parts Shutter Island and a wet fart (Sharter Island?). If the trailer you’re about to witness is any indication, Brutal should set MMA back 15 years at the minimum.

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Fight Flicks Review: Fight Life Offers a Candid, If Well-Traveled Look Into the Mind of an MMA Fighter

There’s a moment early on in Fight Life in which Jake Shields laments (or comes as close to it as he can while retaining his trademark roboticness) the negative effects his career has had on his personal life.

“Everyone’s always like, ‘What are your hobbies?’ and unfortunately, I don’t really have any hobbies because MMA is my hobby, my job, my career. My whole life revolves around it at this point, you know?”

It’s a statement that both serves as the mission statement of the aptly named Fight Life and one that would perhaps support the idea that MMA fighters are not the most intriguing subjects around which to base a documentary. Fighters fight for their families, or to overcome demons from their past, or simply because it’s all they know. While these may be considered fresh revelations to the most casual of MMA fans, it’s nothing that a seasoned fan of the sport hasn’t been treated to a zillion times over in the lead-up to a UFC event or boxing match. As a result, Fight Life winds up feeling less like an intimate look into the personal lives of guys like Shields and Beerbohm and more like an 80-minute Countdown episode.

Chronicling the lives of Jake Shields and Lyle Beerbohm (among others) in the lead-up to their 2009 fights with Robbie Lawler and Duane Ludwig, respectively, the documentary from James Z. Feng is an equally inspiring and underwhelming look at the daily struggles and triumphs of the professional mixed martial artist. Part of the blame for the film’s shortcomings can be placed on its subjects — or at least Shields, who has never been a charismatic individual despite his accomplishments. But really, the biggest issue facing the film is its outdated perspective. MMA has undergone several huge changes in the time between when Fight Life was shot and its release, and neither Shields nor Beerbohm have exactly become the dominant forces that the documentary attempts to set them up as.

That’s not to say that Fight Life is absent of any compelling moments, however…

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Fight Flicks Review: In the Blood aka “Gina Carano Ain’t Got Time to Bleed”


(“Easy senorita, ‘juicy’ is a term of endearment in these parts.”)

Fight Flicks is a new recurring column on CagePotato that focuses on overlooked, underrated, or just plain awesome fight-centric films. This week, we’re reviewing Gina Carano’s ziplining-gone-wrong revenge flick, In the Blood. 

That rumors of Gina Carano‘s potential MMA return continue to dominate headlines despite her five year absence from the sport says a lot about the level of popularity she ascended to while fighting for Strikeforce, a since-deceased fight promotion that many of her current fans might not know ever existed. Carano’s recent turns in Haywire and Fast & Furious 6 have not only exposed her to an entirely new legion of fans, thusly fueling their/our desire to see her compete again, but have paved the way for tough, attractive female fighters like her (Ronda Rousey, for instance) to follow in her footsteps.

Somewhere between Haywire and her upcoming all-women Expendables riff, however, came In the Blood, a so-called “Female Taken set in the Caribbean” that hit movie stands on DVD, Blu-ray, and Digital HD yesterday.

Directed by John Stockwell — who reallyreally seems to enjoy placing his movies on or around tropical islands – and co-starring Cam Gigandet, Luiz Guzman, and the incomparable Danny Trejo, In the Blood aka “Gina Carano Ain’t Got Time to Bleed” takes your run-of-the-mill revenge flick and attempts to inject new life into it by making the protagonist…a woman (*record scratch*). GIF-tacular hijinks ensue, but you already knew that.

Our full review is after the jump. 

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Fight Flicks: Rumble in the Bronx

Fight Flicks is a new recurring column on CagePotato that focuses on overlooked, underrated, or just plain awesome fight-centric films currently available on Youtube. For our second installment, we focus on the Jackie Chan classic, Rumble in the Bronx. 

There’s a saying where I come from, “The universe provides.” It’s rather self-explanatory, but basically, “The universe provides” posits that the keys to solving any problem, no matter how trivial, can be found in the world around us with the help of a little inventive thinking. It’s a pseudo-philosophical understanding of “Life Hacks“ among us self-reliant, redneck MacGyver types, if you will.

In any case, it’s a philosophy that was clearly not lost on Jackie Chan, who burst into the mainstream with his environment-as-a-weapon style of martial arts in the 1995 fight flick classic, Rumble in the Bronx. Although Chan had already gained notoriety in his native Hong Kong during the 70′s and 80′s with such movies as Drunken Master, Police Story, and Armour of God, it wasn’t until Rumble in the Bronx that Chan truly introduced audiences to his hyper-energetic style of fighting that was equal parts Chinese martial arts, parkour, and slapstick humor.

I’ve already spoke at length about my love of Rumble in the Bronx. From the insanely intricate fight choreography/stunts right down to the cartoonish acting and horrendous dubbing (and of course, Francoise Yip), I would defy you to name a more entertaining flick from Chan’s historic career (LALALALA CAN’T HEAR YOU DRUNKEN MASTER 2!!). No, Rumble in the Bronx features a hovercraft fight, a no-net, building-to-building jump, and the most astounding 4-minute “man vs. an army” sequence ever committed to film, and therefore stands above them all.

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Fight Flicks: Knuckle


(via BestMMADocumentaries)

Fight Flicks is a new recurring column on CagePotato that focuses on overlooked, underrated, or just plain awesome fight-centric films currently available on Youtube. For our first installment, we revisit the 2012 Irish bare-knuckle boxing documentary, Knuckle.

“It will never stop, but as long as no one else is hurt or killed, just let them fight and get it out of the way.”

So goes the emotional core of Knuckle, Ian Palmer’s twelve year exploration into the seedy underbelly of Irish bare-knuckle boxing, and more specifically, a perpetual, unresolvable feud between several traveling families that has revolved around the sport for over half a century.

That’s right, Knuckle is about pikeys — temperamental, occasionally drunk, and eternally irrational pikeys. But don’t be fooled, Knuckle isn’t all funny accents and caravans. Well, there *are* funny accents (the film is in English yet subtitles are required) and caravans abound in Knuckle, but the film just as much about the kind of ruthless barbarity depicted by Brad Pitt & Co. in Snatch as it is about family, loyalty, and tradition triumphing over reason. Essentially, it’s Snatch meets Hatfields & McCoys.

Spanning over a decade and focusing on three feuding families — The Quinns, the Nevins, and the Joyces — Knuckle is like a guerilla version of one of those gang-centric television shows you’d see Spike TV or the History Channel at 3 in the afternoon. Like the Hell’s Angels and Bandidos or the Bloods and the Crips, these three clans (and some outside, lesser-despised families thrown in for good measure) are locked in a decades-old rivalry with no apparent end in sight. Unlike the latter gangs, however, the families in Knuckle do not fight over territory or drugs; they fight “over names.” They fight for a diluted sense of honor and the “right” to take the piss out of their relatives while getting piss drunk with their *other* relatives afterward. Oh yeah, and the winning tribe also gets “some cash for the holidays.” It is as insane as it sounds.

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