MMA Fighter Challenges People to Punch Him in the Face, Everyone Fails

Tag: Jon Fitch

WSOF 11 Results: Gaethje Knocks Out Newell, Fitch Blankets Hallman

WSOF 11 completed the first leg of this weekend’s MMA triple crown–WSOF 11, UFC 175, and then the TUF 19 Finale. By all accounts (including our own), WSOF 11 was a solid MMA event. The pacing was perfect, and (almost) the fights all delivered.

We were lucky enough to watch the card at a postponed 4th of July BBQ (it rained at Castle CagePotato yesterday). Here’s a brief recap of the night’s events:

In the first fight of the night, Cody Bollinger steamrolled over Pablo Alfonso. He submitted him with a rear-naked choke in under three minutes. Not much else to tell.

In the next bout, Melvin Guillard made his triumphant return to MMA. This was Guillard’s first fight since the UFC cut him after his loss to Michael Johnson. He squared off against Gesias Cavalcante and picked him apart. Guillard looked crisp, fast, and accurate. He seemingly had his shit together, which allowed him to put Cavalcante away in the second round via TKO.

The recap for Jon Fitch vs. Dennis Hallman and Nick Newell vs. Justin Gaethje are after the jump.

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Would Anybody Out There Like to Fight Jon Fitch at WSOF 11? Anybody? [UPDATED AGAIN]


(As long as Fitch agrees to be unconscious when the fight starts, you’ve got yourself a deal. / Photo via Sherdog)

For the third time in six weeks, Jon Fitch has lost his opponent for his World Series of Fighting 11 promotional debut. Yesterday, Josh Burkman tweeted that he was forced to withdraw from his scheduled rubber-match against Fitch at the July 5th NBC card, due to a hyperextended elbow, ligament damage, and a bone bruise. So, to briefly summarize:

March 29: Fitch is booked for a welterweight title fight at WSOF 11 against Rousimar Palhares, after claiming that he’d never fight Palhares.

April 30th: Palhares withdraws from the fight to take care of his sick mother, Ali Abdel-Aziz loses his mind.

May 2nd: Fitch gets booked in a stylistic nightmare fight against Jake Shields, a match that MMA fans around the world have been asking for, sarcastically.

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Friday Links: Dana White’s Rich Guy Problems, WSOF Books Burkman vs. Fitch III, Every Face Punch From ‘Road House’ + More


(That Elliott dude is basically Spider from Goodfellas. He’s going to snap back at Dana one day and get shot for it. / Props: TheMMAMoguls)

UFC Embedded: In Which Dana White Is Banned From Gambling at the Palms (MMAFighting)

Josh Burkman vs. Jon Fitch III booked for WSOF 11 co-headliner (MMAJunkie)

Dan Henderson Feeling ‘Pretty Good’ Off TRT, But Doesn’t Think Banning It Solved the Real Problem (MMAWeekly)

Dana White Says Ronda Rousey Beat Up Two Huge Men so Badly They Filed Charges (BleacherReport)

UFC on FOX 12: Daron Cruickshank vs. Jorge Masvidal Booked for July 26 in San Jose (MMAMania)

When Road Rage Turns Into Street Fighting (Break)

Patrick Cummins Gets His Next UFC Fight Booked (Sherdog)

The Most Hilarious Things About the Lawsuit Filed Against Johnny Manziel (EveryJoe)

Disney Princesses With Steve Buscemi Eyes (PopHangover)

A Brief History of NBA Teammates Yelling at One Another (Complex)

Classic Crush: Betsy Russell, ‘Private School’ Superbabe of the ’80s (HolyTaco)

The 20 Most Amazing Railway Stations in the World (HiConsumption)

Every Face Punch From ‘Road House’ (FilmDrunk)

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Today in Injuries: Pat Curran Withdraws From Bellator 121 Title Fight, Jake Shields Out of WSOF 11 Bout With Jon Fitch


(Just be real, Pat. You woke up and the belt was gone. It happens. / Photo via @PatCurranMMA)

Due to a severe right calf strain, Bellator featherweight champion Pat Curran will be unable to defend his title against top contender Patricio “Pitbull” Freire at Bellator 121, June 6th in Thackerville, Oklahoma. As Curran stated in a release yesterday:

I have my sights set on getting back into the cage as soon as possible, with July in mind, but I want to be 100 percent healthy heading into that cage to smash ‘Pitbull.’

Bellator has had a rotten stretch of luck lately with its champions staying healthy. Most notably, Eddie Alvarez had to pull out of the promotion’s first pay-per-view event due to a concussion — which led to Will Brooks winning an interim lightweight title that may or may not be worth the leather it’s printed on. Plus, Bellator bantamweight champion Eduardo Dantas suffered a head injury of his own in training last month, and was forced to withdraw from his scheduled May 2nd title defense against Joe Warren.

In other injury news…

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WSOF VP Ali Abdel-Aziz Goes on the Warpath After Rousimar Palhares Pulls Out of Title Fight With Jon Fitch


(Just another day in the life of Paul Harris. Photo via Getty.)

Like my sexual history, the WSOF career of Rousimar Palhares has been brief and emotionally devastating. After being gifted an immediate shot at the WSOF welterweight title against Steve Carl at WSOF 9, Palhares secured said title via a brutal heel-hook in just over a minute. The victory set Palhares up with a fight against fellow UFC castaway Jon Fitch that was scheduled to go down at WSOF 11 on July 5th, but today brought the news that Palhares has withdrawn from the fight to take care of his sick mother.

A reasonable excuse if there ever was one, but one that also apparently pissed WSOF executive vice president Ali Abdel-Aziz right the f*ck off. Aziz, who has publicly spatted with WSOF fighter Josh Burkman (and Vinny Magalhaes) in the past, told MMAFighting earlier today that he is sick of being taken advantage by guys like Palhares with their “bullshit stories” about their “sick mothers” and “impoverished upbringing.” Okay, those quotes were made up, but here’s what he actually said:

Enough is enough. I have to put WSOF first and everyone else second. No more Mr. Nice Guy.

We’re getting screwed. I’m trying to put on a fight card and be nice to fighters, and now they don’t want to fight each other.

I’m getting sick of this. If a fighter is not going to respect the promotion, he is going to be shelved for a long time. I will not release anyone to another promotion. Fighters must honor their contracts. 

Eesh. I can see where Aziz is coming from here, but for Christ’s sake, we’re talking about Rousimar’s mother here. Show the Mapinguari her due respect, Ali, or suffer the consequences.

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21 Times the UFC Proved They Cared More About Entertainment Than Sport


(#22: Building doors out of wet cardboard for dramatic effect.)

The UFC is not a sports organization. They’re an entertainment company that dabbles in athletic competition. Here’s the proof:

1. Firing Jake Shields.

2. Firing Yushin Okami.

3. Firing Jon Fitch.

4. Not firing Dan Hardy (“I like guys who WAR“)

5. Giving Chael Sonnen a title shot coming off a loss.

6. Giving Nick Diaz a title shot coming off a loss.

7. Bringing a 1-0 Brock Lesnar into the UFC.

8. James Toney.

9. Signing Sean Gannon after he beat Kimbo Slice via exhaustion in an illegal bare-knuckle street fight.

10. Putting Kimbo Slice on a main card after he went 0-1 in the TUF House.

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Chopped: Seven of the Most Surprising UFC Cuts in Recent Memory


(Photo via Getty. Depression via reality.)

The news that Jake Shields had been axed by the UFC on Tuesday was not taken lightly by MMA fans who had referred to the former Strikeforce champion as “Jake Shieldzzzz” for years prior. Days later, we are still trying to make sense of the decision to cut Shields following his first loss in two and a half years, but it was an easy one to make in the eyes of Dana White, who basically told reporters that Shields was released because he didn’t “WAR!!” enough.

As several publications have noted, the firing of Shields has once again highlighted the UFC’s ever-burgeoning “entertainment over sport” mindset when it comes to the legitimacy of their product. It’s the reason guys like Leonard Garcia and Dan Hardy remained with the promotion after two, three, four losses in a row and why Ben Askren was never even given a shot in the first place despite being a top 10 welterweight on damn near everybody’s list. Where just a few years ago, the Tank Abbotts of the world were ridiculed for their one-dimensional, bar brawler-esque approach to MMA, they are now being praised for their ability to entertain and absorb punishment over actually win a fight.

MMA is a sport. The UFC is a spectacle. White’s belief that Gina Carano would deserve an immediate title shot should she sign with the promotion is proof of this. The signing of Brock Lesnar after one fight is proof of this. James Toney is proof of this. We are living in an era of the UFC where the “Just Bleed” guy has risen from psychotic fanboy to upper management, and unfortunately, the firing of Jake Shields was not the first of its kind…

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What’s to Blame for UFC 169′s Record-Setting Amount of Decisions?


(Dana White called UFC 169 a “10-decision, record-breaking catastrophe.” / Photo via Getty)

By Matt Saccaro

To say the UFC had an off night with UFC 169 would be an understatement. True, the card was record-breaking, but in the worst way possible. It featured more fights ending in a decision than any other fight card in UFC history. So many fights going to the judges isn’t a result of just bad luck. There are a few factors at play when a fight goes to a decision.

First, the fighters could be so evenly matched they either complement or negate one another. The former can result in a match like Dan Henderson vs. Shogun Rua or, to delve further into MMA’s past, Tyson Griffin vs. Clay Guida. The latter kind a fight—one between negating styles of equally matched fighters—results in any dime-a-dozen decision that features long bouts of stalling against the cage or ineffective, listless striking. The kind of fights the UFC presented to us in spades last night, and have been peddling on prelims (and even main cards) for a while now.

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GSP Does Better Than Finish Fights, He Finishes Careers


(When he’s not lifting five-pound dumbbells, he’s ruining careers. / Image courtesy of GSP RUSHFIT)

By Nathan Smith

I know what a lot of you were thinking (and by “a lot” I mean nobody): Where is The12ozCurls with his obligatory fluffy, ball-washing post on Georges St. Pierre pertaining to his upcoming fight? Well, I hate to disappoint my dozens of CagePotato fans and Twitter followers (seriously, *bottom lip quivers* I got like 50) so I will give you what you want. What most of you want is more ammo to fire in my direction if/when GSP loses. And judging from the current CP Fight Picking Contest stats, a majority of you think Johny Hendricks is going to put my beloved Canadian to sleep on Saturday night. You are all entitled to your opinion no matter how wrong it might be.

Let me explain: GSP has dominated the welterweight division for the better part of a decade. He has systematically vanquished each foe with a combination of athleticism, technique, cardio and sound game-planning. There is no debating that. Yet most of the flat-billed hat-wearing mouth-breathing meatheads that scream “KNEEEEES!” whenever there is a clinch, constantly talk shit on GSP because he is a boring fighter that doesn’t finish (and because he is handsome . . . . really really handsome).

That is the knock on one of the greatest MMA fighters of all time—that he’s ambien personified—but upon further review, GSP has done far more long-term damage to his last 8 opponents than ending a fight via TKO or submission. He effectively sent their careers into the toilet, which is far worse than just knocking them out cold. All of the following fighters were the #1 contender for the UFC WW Championship but each one was sent packing like my ex-wife (What? Too soon?). I’ll start with all the fights after GSP kneed Matt Serra’s kidneys into oblivion and became the undisputed champ back at UFC 83.

Take a look at the first guy who’s career GSP derailed after the jump.

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WSOF 6 Recap: Almost All of the Guys You’ve Heard of Lost


(Jon Fitch grimaces at his first taste of New York weather / Via Getty)

Bellator is where the bad UFC castoffs go and, from what we’ve seen so far, World Series of Fighting is where the good UFC castoffs go—the ones who shouldn’t have been fired because they were legitimately talented or were in the UFC’s own top-10 rankings when they were let go.

But at WSOF 6, the tried and true formula of putting ex-UFC fighters with name value against fighters without Wikipedia pages failed. Nearly all the fighters that you’re reading this recap for lost.

Jacob Volkmann? He lost a unanimous decision to Pride vet Luiz Firmino. Maybe Volkmann’s head wasn’t in the game because Obamacare passed or something.

Miguel Torres lost too, sadly. The unheralded Pablo Alfonso dispatched the former WEC champ in the first round. He rocked Torres with punches which ultimately set up a guillotine choke finish at 3:05. Torres was once 37-1. Now he’s 40-7 and just lost decisively to a no-name (who’s record was 7-5 heading into the fight) on the prelims of a minor league show. Can it get much worse? Torres doesn’t have a comeback in him. And at age 32, the problem is both the years and the mileage. If Torres doesn’t retire, he might be in for a rough, Jens Pulver-like future.

Remember Joe Lauzon‘s younger brother Dan who was in the UFC back in 2006 at the young age of 18, losing to Spencer Fisher? Remember when he returned in 2010 and lost to both Cole Miller and Efrain Escudero. After the two failed stints in the UFC, Lauzon won five fights in a row on the regional scene. His luck didn’t continue at WSOF 6. The man with the hardest to pronounce last name in MMA, Justin Gaethje, cut Lauzon’s legs out from under him throughout the first round. In the second round, Lauzon was slow and immobile enough for Gaethje to capitalize on it with a right hook and an uppercut which put Lauzon’s lights out.

Find out what happened to Jon Fitch and Josh Burkman, as well as the complete results of the card after the jump.

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