MMA Fighter Challenges People to Punch Him in the Face, Everyone Fails

Tag: Lew Polley

FYI, That Guy Who Came in 32 Pounds Heavy at WSOF 4 is Fighting an Olympian Wrestler This Weekend


(You can’t place all the blame on Polley. He learned Beer Gut MMA from the master. Photo via MMAInterviews.)

Over the weekend, Bellator veteran Lew “The Titan” Polley showed up to the World Series of Fighting 4 weigh-ins some 32 pounds over the light heavyweight limit (insert scathing Anthony Johnson fat joke). His fight with Hans Stringer was cancelled almost immediately thereafter and Polley was quick to offer a heartfelt if not incredibly vague apology on his Twitter account, the background photo of which ironically depicts Polley weighing in.

Although no specific reasons for Polley’s Weigh-In Failure Leaderboard-topping effort have yet to be given, WSOF matchmaker Ali Abdel-Aziz assured MMAFighting and therefore the world yesterday that yes, Polley had been fired. The details he did reveal about Polley’s weight cut, however, were bewildering to say the least:

He told me he was cutting from 289 [at the beginning of camp]. I don’t know what his motive was to be 289 six weeks out. But he cost us a lot of money and his opponent was coming in from Holland and I think it’s disrespectful to his opponent to go into it like that. 

289 pounds?!! You see this, Jon Jones? THIS IS WHERE YOU’RE HEADED, YOU FAT FUCK.

Read More DIGG THIS

WSOF 4 Weigh-In Results: Lew Polley Misses Weight by 32 Pounds, LIKE A BOSS


(Spong vs. DeAnda face-off, via ZombieProphet)

The fighters competing at tomorrow night’s World Series of Fighting 4: Spong vs. DeAnda event weighed in today at Dave and Buster’s in Ontario, California, and things went smoothly for the most part. The headliners made weight. Newell made weight. Jorge Santiago weighed in at 172.4 pounds on his first attempt, but was more than two pounds lighter when he tried again. And Lew Polley showed up at 237 pounds for a light-heavyweight bout. Holy shit. Awesome.

Polley’s weight wasn’t even announced publicly — WSOF officials only said that he was “significantly over” the contracted weight and removed him from the bout — but MMAJunkie’s John Morgan got the actual number from an event source. By the way, Polley missing weight by 32 pounds puts him at #1 on the Weigh-In Failure Leaderboard, destroying the old record of 23.75. Polley has already apologized on twitter, although he didn’t offer an explanation as to what went wrong.

Tomorrow night’s event was supposed to be Polley’s WSOF debut, and it’s unlikely that the promotion will have him back. Fortunately, Polley’s scheduled opponent Hans Stringer was paid his show money. The full WSOF 4 weigh-in results are after the jump, in case you’re curious.

Read More DIGG THIS

‘TUF 13′ Episode 6 Recap: The Escape Goat

Zach Davis Jake Busey Chuck O'Neil TUF 13 episode 6
(Above: Zach Davis’s face-off with Chuck O’Neil. Below: Jake Busey, for comparison. Gif via ironforgesiron.com)

It’s a big ol’ locker-room pity party on Team Dos Santos following Mick Bowman’s loss. “Sometimes it’s not our time to be winner, but we have to try our best,” Junior says, trying to raise Mick’s spirits. He explains that the UFC is looking for exciting fighters and exciting fights. Lew Polley sees it differently: “You can say whatever you want, I don’t care, but the fact of the matter is, your job is just to win the fight. If it’s boring [and] you win, great. If it’s exciting [and] you lose, then what?”

Junior is not pleased to be contradicted in front of his team. “I think we make the guys a little bit confused, Lew,” he says. “Because sometimes I say something and you say something different…I know you’re a good fighter, I’m glad you’re here, but I think we need to talk to each other.” Uh-ohhh.

Back on the victorious Team Chickenshit, Brock tells Len Bentley that if they win their next two fights, he’s in line for a wild card spot. (Pay attention. This will become important later in the show.) And like clockwork, Len goes down grabbing his knee in practice. “I’m speechless,” Brock says, not literally speechless. “Maybe it’s time to close shop here for the day…I just want to exit the building. I’m just sick to my stomach.”

Read More DIGG THIS

‘TUF 13′ Episode 5 Recap: My F*ck You Punch

(Normal bedtime stuff.)

Len Bentley still has his panties in a bunch from Coach Lesnar’s ass-chewing after Ramsey Nijem defeated Charlie Rader last week. Bentley storms out of the Team Green locker room. “I’m not going to sit here and get punked out,” he says. “It’s like, bro, you weren’t even here for my fight.” Brock is cool with Bentley’s nonviolent protest, but says that deep down Len knows he could’ve given more during his fight. When Bentley returns, Brock admits he hasn’t exactly *watched* that fight yet and Len says if he had, he’d know Bentley got robbed by the judges. “It’s over, buddy,” Lesnar tells him, in a tone that clearly means “big deal.”

Brock says he’s still looking for someone to wow him and then he tries to make an issue out of how fighting is his livelihood. As if he’s not a kabillionaire who just took up MMA like four years ago. “When you guys step in that Octagon, it’s kill or be killed,” Lesnar says. Then, just for good measure, he says it again: “Kill … or be killed.” Now that’s coaching.

Read More DIGG THIS

‘TUF 13′ Drama Alert: Lew Polley Says Junior Dos Santos Was More Interested in Camera Time Than Helping Fighters

Lew Polley TUF 13 Team Dos Santos
(“No, I’ve never been a male nurse. Why does everybody keep asking me that?”)

At the end of last night’s episode of The Ultimate Fighter: Team Lesnar vs. Team Dos Santos, we saw that tension was about to develop between Junior Dos Santos and his outspoken assistant coach Lew Polley. Reading Lew’s guest-blog for MMA Junkie, you get the sense that the two never really made up — why else would Polley be throwing JDS under the bus in public? Here’s what the Team Dos Santos wrestling specialist wrote about the coaching dynamic on the show:

Myself and the other coaches were starting to butt heads already. Junior had never coached before, and fights and trains as a heavyweight, which means he doesn’t cut weight, nor has he fought at a pace that isn’t conducive to a heavyweight fight. Junior has a limited understanding of English. This and my wrestling is why I was brought in. In the season opener, Junior said pretty much the same thing. His other coaches felt differently, and the tension was mounting.

Junior decided to bring in a strength coach that was not very good at his job, or at least explaining why he was having the guys train in such a manner. The Brazilian coaches felt I was pushing too hard because I was trying to maximize the time we had in the gym. Before the fight, it became an issue. I would suggest an aggressive yet normal approach to maximize the guys time and skills, trying to be more efficient. Junior and the other staff decided it was a wrestling vs. jiu-jitsu thing.

Read More DIGG THIS
CagePotatoMMA