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The 16 Sexiest WAGs of ‘Expendables’ Cast Members

Tag: Mike Tyson

Jon Jones Hung Out With Brock Lesnar and Mike Tyson This Weekend, WHAT DID YOU DO??

Careful Mike, the man just had surgery! Also, this:

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Photo of the Year Candidate: Mike Tyson Writes ‘Dick’ on Dana White’s Forehead


(Props: danawhiteufc on Instagram)

There are only two men in the world who could get away with this: Mike Tyson, and Lorenzo “The Hulk” Fertitta.

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CagePotato Roundtable #32: Who Is Your Favorite Fictional Fighter of All Time?


(Woah, they got constipated Ryu as a secret unlockable character in this game? Count me in!)

The inclusion of Bruce Lee in EA Sports’ derpy-looking UFC game over actual fighters like bantamweight champion TJ Dillashaw not only enraged the CP staff to no end, but got us thinking about other characters that should’ve been included in the roster. That’s right, the CagePotato Roundtable is back, and with special guest Sydnie Jones of WomensMMA! This week’s topic: Who is Your Favorite Fictional Fighter of All Time? 

Nathan Smith

If he dies, he dies.

Those iconic words were delivered in a callous monotone shortly after this fighter beat Apollo Creed to death in an exhibition boxing match. You can blame Rocky Balboa for not throwing in the towel (and I am sure Creed’s wife still does) or you can blame Creed’s advanced age, but the fact remains, this pugilist made sure the only Apollo Creed appearances in future Rocky movies would be via flashback sequences. That is how I was introduced to the greatest fictional fighter of all time – Ivan Drago.

Weighing in at 261 lbs. and standing 6’5” Drago looked like the epitome of a living, breathing action figure. He had it all. From the chiseled physique to the thousand-yard-stare, Drago accompanied those characteristics with a hair cut that would make Iceman jealous and a punch that measured 1850 psi.

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Friday Links: The Philosophy of Johny Hendricks, Cormier vs. Cavalcante and MacDonald vs. Woodley in the Works, March Madness Mascotology + More


(Check out this inspiring behind-the-scenes video of Johny Hendricks bouncing back from his loss to Georges St-Pierre to win the welterweight title at UFC 171. / Props: AskMen)

Daniel Cormier vs. Rafael Cavalcante in the Works for UFC 175 in July (BleacherReport)

This Mike Tyson x Balrog Mash-Up Highlight Is All You Need in Your Life (MiddleEasy)

Stunning New Visions From MMA Ring Girl/Model Sierra Rene (Babes of MMA)

UFC Reportedly Targeting Rory MacDonald vs. Tyron Woodley for UFC 174 (BloodyElbow)

Francis Carmont vs. C.B. Dollaway Co-Headlines UFC Fight Night 41 in Berlin (MMAJunkie)

Mascotology: Predicting This Year’s Sweet Sixteen Winners by Mascot (HolyTaco)

Hottest Webcam Girl of the Year: Vote Now for the Elite 8! (EveryJoe)

7 Reasons the Average Person Would Never Survive in Any Video Game (Guyism)

The Funniest YouTube Comments Ever Posted (PopHangover)

16 Sexiest ‘Game of Thrones’ Moments (Ranker)

Britney Spears Looks Pretty Good in a Bikini, Actually (DrunkenStepfather)

The 25 Funniest Celebrity Photobombs Ever (WorldWideInterweb)

The 50 Best Action Movies of All Time (HiConsumption)

10 Bible Movies Weirder Than ‘Noah’ (EscapistMagazine)

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CagePotato Ban: Fighters Being *Too* Honest About Their Sketchy Pasts


(Pictured above: The exception to the rule.)

There isn’t a human being among us who doesn’t have some skeletons in their closet. As a species, we are often genetically predisposed to mental disease, addiction, and all kinds of abnormal behavior. When combined with the meat grinder that is everyday life in the public eye, it is only a matter of time before some of these skeletons, these abnormal tendencies, are uncovered for the world to see and later criticize from our two most prestigious ivory towers, Hindsight and Judgement.

And while there are plenty of combat sports competitors who were raised under “normal” circumstances in a “normal” household, who went on to become poster boys for the “normalness” of their organizations/sports and so on, there are just as many fighters who came from nothing, and when faced with the overwhelming eye of the public, allowed these abnormal tendencies to be placed center stage and eventually destroy them.

One such fighter is Mike Tyson, who after rising to the highest ranks of the boxing world some thirty years ago, saw his fame, fortune, and fanbase crumble beneath the weight of drug addiction and scandal. Nowadays, a wiser, gentler Tyson has emerged, unabashedly sharing the most intimate details of his past in an effort to both restore his shattered reputation and warn young fighters of the potential dangers they could face down the line.

The problem is, “Iron Mike” is being a little *too* candid as of late. Join us after the jump to see what we mean.

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Confusing the Enemy: What MMA Needs to Learn From the Precedent of Boxing


(“So if you win, your salary doubles from $22,000 to $44,000? And if it’s the best fight on the card, they give you a $50,000 bonus? Wow. That’s adorable, man.”)

By Brian J. D’Souza

Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s record $41.5 million guarantee for facing Canelo Alvarez in September elicited a series of reactions from the MMA community. Some fighters like Tito Ortiz made ridiculous comparisons (“What am I doing different from [Floyd Mayweather Jr.]?”). Others, like current UFC light-heavyweight champion Jon Jones knew it was more politically expedient to downplay any direct comparison between revenues in boxing and MMA (“Boxing has been around over 100 years…The foundation is set and the money is there. MMA is so new.”). But the question looms large — why is it that boxing can boast stratospheric paydays whereas MMA’s purses are deliberately obscured from public knowledge?

We could talk about the structure of modern boxing where there is competition between promoters (Bob Arum, Golden Boy, etc.) and TV networks (HBO, Showtime, etc.), which drives boxing purses up. Or we could focus on the formula for self-promoting fights that Oscar de la Hoya and Floyd Mayweather Jr. derived tremendous benefit from. The fact remains that with its limited 20-year history, MMA has much more in common with the monopolistic and mafia-controlled boxing of the 1950s and ‘60s than it does with modern boxing.

What the industry tends to ignore is that the passage of time is not what leads to progress. It was five years ago in 2008 that Jon Fitch was tossed overboard by the UFC for refusing to sign away his likeness rights away in perpetuity. While managers and fighters could have drawn a line in the sand, squared up with Zuffa and said “You’ve taken enough from us,” their response to the likeness rights situation was completely muted.

“That wasn’t a battle we chose to fight. All of our guys agreed,” said American Top Team president Dan Lambert.

Thus, the precedent was set. MMA managers acting out of fear negotiated with the UFC by giving up something in exchange for nothing.

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Ronda Rousey: ‘Crazy’ Like a Champion


(Ronda Rousey after successfully defending her UFC bantamweight title against Liz Carmouche in February. | Photo via Getty)

By Elias Cepeda

There seems to be a lot of chatter about Ronda Rousey’s mental state lately. The UFC women’s bantamweight champion has always gotten attention for her intensity and arm-snapping viciousness, but ever since Rousey the TUF 18 Coach began appearing on television a few weeks ago, the notion that the undefeated fighter is mentally unstable has started to pick up steam.

There was Ronda becoming infuriated when Meisha Tate dared to celebrate her own fighter’s win over Team Rousey’s Shayna Baszler. There was Ronda getting in the face of and taunting Tate’s coach/manager/boyfriend Bryan Caraway. There was Ronda kicking open the UFC gym door and screaming Tate’s team out because they’d gone approximately 30 seconds over their scheduled time. In last week’s episode, Ronda launched some of her trademark hostility against UFC vet and Team Tate assistant coach Dennis Hallman.

And then, of course, there’s Ronda crying. A lot. Like, all the time.

Not your normal, boo-hoo type of crying, either. Hers is an angry, motivated and terrifying type of cry. Former Strikeforce champion and would-be Rousey rival Cristiane “Cyborg” Justino called Rousey “mentally sick” after watching her on The Ultimate Fighter. Recently, Hallman did an interview where he recounted a story of an incident he said happened on the TUF set where Rousey told a producer of the show to shut their mouth while she was speaking to her, and then said that he believed that Ronda had mental health issues.

I’ve already written in partial jest that Rousey’s mind is evidently a dark and scary place, but is the two-time Olympian “crazy?” The simple answer is, “no.”

If Ronda Rousey is crazy, it’s the type of crazy that has become familiar to us in great competitors. Rousey isn’t an out-of-control head case, she’s a competitor. She’s not crazy, she’s a champion. And like many champions before her, Ronda is a fiercer competitor than most professional athletes. Her hyper-competitiveness, her apparent need to establish dominance in almost every and any situation, and her ability to used even perceived slights as fuel are traits Rousey shares with the likes of Michael Jordan and Anderson Silva.

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This Just In: Mike Tyson is a Shaolin Monk Who Will Humiliate You at Darts While Blindfolded

Mike Tyson may be a self-admitted recovering alcoholic on the verge of death, but it’s important to remember that he’s also a man who possesses scary, perhaps even otherworldly skills that simply cannot be eroded with time. For an example of this, see the video above, wherein “Iron Mike” nails two bullseyes while f*cking blindfolded as part of an ongoing competition on FOX Sports.

Never in my life have I felt more like a failure than after watching this video. In my history of drunken dart-throwing (I can’t honestly recall if I’ve ever played darts sober), I have nailed a bullseye approximately three or four times. Yes, the viewing audience exploded with raucous applause in each instance, but to see Tyson so nonchalantly pull off such a feat — while completely blind, no less — just confirms that I was never meant to become a professional athlete. It’s a fate I finally accepted after throwing a dart through my roommate’s hand while trying to attempt this insanity.

Also, Katie Nolan. That is all.

-J. Jones 

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[VIDEO] Mike Tyson Says He’s “On the Verge of Dying” Because He’s a “Vicious Alcoholic”

Mike Tyson’s latest press conference may not have inspired a lot of faith in his abilities as a boxing promoter, but this two minute clip from it might be the most touching moment in the outspoken and oft controversial boxing great’s long career.

As was the case with Tyson’s first conference as a promoter, the above clip is equal parts sincerity, remorse and honest-to-God hope. Treating the media crew present at The Turning Stone Casino as if they were his personal therapists, Tyson nearly broke down describing his ongoing battle with drugs and alcohol, an admission that seemed to shock even him:

I’m a bad guy sometimes. I did a lot of bad things, and I want to be forgiven. So in order for me to be forgiven, I hope they can forgive me. I wanna change my life, I wanna live a different life now. I wanna live my sober life. I don’t wanna die. I’m on the verge of dying, because I’m a vicious alcoholic.

I haven’t drank or took drugs in six days, and for me that’s a miracle. I’ve been lying to everybody else that think I was sober, but I’m not. This is my sixth day. I’m never gonna use again. 

Tyson’s past troubles — both professionally and personally — have been documented ad nauseum, but the former champion has made somewhat of a turnaround in the public eye as of late. Once the most reviled figure in boxing, Iron Mike has slowly rebuilt his reputation as one of the most genuinely heartfelt individuals in the combat sports community. We honestly hope that his newfound sobriety will ensure that he hangs around for as long as humanely possible, because we’ll be damned if he isn’t an interesting person to listen to (you know what we mean, you shallow sonsabitches).

In case you were wondering what exactly Tyson was referring to when discussing his beef with Teddy Atlas, join us after the jump for the full scoop.

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[VIDEO] Mike Tyson’s First Press Conference as a Boxing Promoter Will Make you Laugh, Cry, and Cheer


(Props: Steven Lott)

Last month we told you that former boxing great Mike Tyson was becoming a fight promoter. At the time, he said he hoped to do right by the fighters signed to his promotion and not take advantage of them the way past promoters like Don King had done with him during Tyson’s career.

At his first press conference as a boxing promoter (video above), Tyson repeated that goal and hyped an ESPN 2 Friday Night Fights card scheduled for tonight at 9 p.m. ET with his characteristic mixture of humility, profanity, and wisdom.

“I’m a little nervous here but I’m just excited to be involved with this whole establishment,” Tyson told the assembled reporters.

As expected, the questions he fielded from reporters were mostly about Tyson himself. At a certain point, “Iron Mike” tried to bring the focus back to the fighters on the card, encouraging them to pick up their mics and promote themselves.

“I need some of these fighters to come up here and say “I’m going to kill him” or something. I need him to talk about his mother. We need to sell tickets. Come on man. This guy’s a bomber and he’s a gentleman,” Tyson said referring to his main event fighters.

It was interesting that Tyson insisted on not calling the combatants “his” fighters, however. “I don’t own anybody. Those days are over,” Tyson said.

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