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Tag: MMA fight videos

Insane Fight Double-Feature: Ref Cam Catches Bloody Battle w/Head Kick KO and a Jordanian Grappling Match for the Ages

I’ve said this before, but perhaps my favorite aspect of working at CagePotato is not the seemingly endless bankroll to sponsor stuff like this, the kick-ass company car (an ’84 Celica, red), or the mandated “Sexy Bikini Party Fridays” written into all our receptionists contracts. No, the cocaine mountains and rampant sexism are nice and all, but the real reason I come into the office two afternoons a month is you guys. Specifically, the insane fight videos you guys often pass along to us via our tips line.

Take this undiscovered gem of a scrap between Ibrahim El Sawy and Hashem Arkhagha that went down back in December 2012, which was passed along to us by CP reader Farzeen Mohmed. In the main event of an already exciting night of fights put on by Jordanian fight promotion Desert Force, El Sawy and Arkhagha took things to a WHOLE. NOTHA. LEVEL, exchanging near-knockouts and submission attempts with reckless abandon for two action-packed rounds. While the second doesn’t quite stack up to the first in terms of action, it does fit the very definition of a war of attrition. And hey, Yves Lavigne even shows up to ref this thing! SCORE.

Check out the full fight above, then join us after the jump for an equally, if not more riveting fight between a couple of unbreakable Aussies.

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[VIDEO] And Now, Your First-Punch KO of the Day…

The art of the first-punch knockout is an oft underappreciated one, right up there with the opening bell diving heel hook. Most fighters don’t even get their bearings until the second round, yet crazy sons a bitches like Benjamin Pierre-Saint (I know, right?) up there are so dialed in on their opponents that they can literally end the fight before it begins. First-punch knockouts are more devastating yet simultaneously graceful than any footage of a lion attacking a gazelle you will ever see, so check out this prime example that went down at SHINE 2 last weekend and thank us later.

-J. Jones

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Knockout of the Day: Fighter Touches Gloves, Kind of Just Stands There, Gets KTFO’d [VIDEO]


(Props: Amatorska Liga MMA via KnockoutFootage)

When an MMA fighter gets KO’d immediately after a glove-tap, it often means that his opponent was being a cheap dick about it. But in the lightning-fast knockout you see above, all blame should lay upon the victim. See, if you’re going to touch gloves before a fight, do it fast and then get out of the way. DON’T lumber forward with your feet flat and your chin out. And after you do your little fist-bump, for the love of God, get your damn hands up or you will be head-kicked into an embarrassing reverse somersault, like this idiot.

If you’ll notice, the guy on the left doesn’t initiate the tap, but he’s courteous enough to oblige when dipshit over there dangles his arm out like an overcooked noodle. Guy On The Left sees an opportunity, and snatches it with a front-leg roundhouse to the face. The impact is loud, and it is awesome. The only disappointing part is that the shirtless guy still looked like he was ready to bang some more. Ah well. Let this be a lesson to the rest of you aspiring fighters: After the ref starts the fight, “Wait, bro, I wasn’t ready” isn’t really a valid excuse.

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Video: Andrei Arlovski TKO’s Andreas Kraniotakes in Belarus [UPDATED]


(Props: UnderDog22 via MMAFighting)

As we mentioned last week in our profile of Muay Thai coach Said Hatim, Andrei Arlovski competed in his homeland of Belarus on Friday night, taking on German journeyman Andreas Kraniotakes in the headliner of Fight Nights: Battle on Nyamiha. Arlovski appeared loose and in control throughout the fight, which ended in the second round with a big right hand from The Pitbull and some follow-up shots on the ground. You can watch the fight above, which we’ve cued up to the TKO finish.

The match gave Arlovski his second straight win, and his fourth victory in his last five appearances. Hatim won his fight as well, stopping Artem Kazersky by second-round TKO. We’ll update this post if video of that match pops up on the Internet.

Update: And it has. Check out video of the entire event after the jump. Hatim’s fight begins at the 2:06:28 mark.

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‘UFC Fight for the Troops 3′ Video Highlights: Tim Kennedy Scores a Knockout for America, Rustam Khabilov Tries Some Spinnin’ Sh*t + More


(Kennedy vs. Natal finish, via YouTube.com/FoxSports)

Despite the enthusiastic and supportive Fort Campbell crowd, last night’s Fight for the Troops 3 event began with some bitter defeats for the handful of UFC fighters with military backgrounds. Army Staff Sgt./TUF 16 winner Colton Smith kicked off the main card by tapping to a rear-naked choke from TUF 15 winner Michael Chiesa — which earned Chiesa a $50,000 Submission of the Night bonus — while former Marine Liz Carmouche ate her second UFC defeat in a decision loss to Alexis Davis.

Luckily, Tim Kennedy saved the operation. The Special Forces vet fed off the energy in the room and tagged Rafael Natal with a long left hook that put the Brazilian’s lights out near the end of round 1, and won Kennedy a $50,000 Knockout of the Night bump. As he explained after the fight:

I had to wait for the crowd to stop cheering because I was afraid to emotionally commit to something and not do it for the right reasons,” he said. “They’re screaming, ‘Ranger up! Ranger up!’ And I want to start throwing overhands and blitz the guy. I was waiting for them to stop, and they didn’t stop. Then they started cheering ‘U-S-A!,’ and ‘Kennedy!,’ and I was like, ‘For the love of God.’

It had a negative effect on me because I was waiting and apprehensive. If there was any amount of pressure that could be put on a single fighter for a fight, I can’t think of a situation that would be more stressful than this.

By the way, Kennedy tore his quad in the last week of training camp, but as he told Ariel Helwani later, “There’s no way you’re getting me off this card. They would have had to shoot me. If they had to roll me up with a wheelchair, I would have got in that cage, I didn’t care.”

Check out video of Kennedy’s knockout above, check out full results from the fight card right here, and follow us after the jump for lots more UFC Fight for the Troops 3 video highlights…

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The Top 24 Mixed Martial Artists Who Lost Their First Fight


(Renan Barao: Started from the bottom, now he here. / Photo via Getty)

By Adam Martin

At the UFC 165 post-fight presser last month, UFC president Dana White showered praise upon UFC interim bantamweight champion Renan Barao, calling him one of the best pound-for-pound fighters in the sport and remarking that the media hadn’t given enough credit to his eight-year, 32-fight undefeated streak, which has remained pristine since May 2005.

Barao has only tasted defeat once, and it was in the first fight of his career. The fact that he’s rebounded with the longest current undefeated streak in mixed martial arts — despite the fact that his first loss could have ruined his confidence forever — is absolutely amazing to me, as many young would-be prospects have crashed and burned in their debuts, never to be heard of again.

It got me thinking: What other mixed martial artists lost their first fight but then went on to have great success? I expected to bang out a list of ten fighters, but once I started doing the research, it blew my mind that some of the best fighters to ever compete in the sport, and a number of currently top 10-ranked fighters, actually lost their very first fight.

And so, I compiled a list of the top 24 MMA fighters of all time who lost their first fight. The list is based on accomplishments in the sport, overall skill level, and potential. Enjoy, and if I somehow missed somebody notable, please leave a comment below and explain why he or she should be included.

Honorable mentions: Matt “The Wizard” Hume (5-5), Wesley “Cabbage” Correira (20-15), Ryan “The Big Deal” Jimmo (18-2), Rodrigo Damm (11-6), James Te Huna (16-6)

24. Travis “The Ironman” Fulton (249-49-10, 1 NC)

(Photo via ThunderPromotions)

On July 26, 1996, at the age of 19 years old, Travis Fulton fought Dave Strasser in his MMA debut at Gladiators 1 in Davenport, Iowa, losing the fight via first-round submission. He then went on to win 249 fights, the most wins in mixed martial arts history. Fulton also holds the record for most fights (309) and most knockout wins (91) in MMA history.

Mind = blown.

Was Fulton a can crusher? Yes, yes he was. Or, should I say, yes he is, as he beat some nobody in his native Iowa just this past March. But you don’t win 249 MMA fights by accident, and Fulton deserves a place on this list based on volume alone.

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Fallon Fox Gets TKO’d, Holly Holm and Henry Cejudo Stay Undefeated [VIDEOS]


(Fallon Fox vs. Ashlee Evans-Smith highlights, via AXS TV Fights)

There was a considerable amount of combat sports action this weekend. Timothy Bradley took a split decision over Juan Manuel Marquez, retaining his WBO welterweight title. Tyrone Spong avenged a past draw against Nathan Corbett with a vicious left hook knockout in the second round at Glory 11. But this is CagePotato; we deal in MMA here. And while most of the focus was on Bellator this weekend (which is to say, there wasn’t a lot of focus this weekend), there were three other notable MMA fights that warranted attention. Olympic wrestling gold medalist Henry Cejudo notched yet another victory, and both Holly Holm and Fallon Fox, WMMA prospects fan-favorities celebrities fighters who you know about, fought this weekend. While the results were different for the three, each took a step towards fulfilling what potential they possess. For better or worse.

We’ll start with Fallon Fox, just to get her out of the way. Despite the publicity she’s received, Fox isn’t what you might call a “good” fighter. Her opponents thus far have been terrible, and the supposed advantage she possesses from being transgender is looking tenuous at best after her appearance at Championship Fighting Alliance 12 in Coral Gables, Florida on Saturday. Although Fox had her moments in the first round, her opponent Ashlee Evans-Smith ramped up the pressure in the second and it paid dividends. Smith, in just her second professional fight, managed to take Fox down and almost finish her in the second round before the bell sounded. There was some controversy, as the crowd was so enthusiastic (“virulently transphobic” could also work here) that it was unclear at what point the bell had rung and whether the fight had been stopped. Ultimately, it didn’t matter. Evans-Smith simply repeated the process in the third round, putting Fox away with punches from the mount position.

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Insane Submission of the Day: The ‘Modified Americana,’ a.k.a The ‘Inverted Twister Cruciplata’


(Props: themmaclinic via MiddleEasy)

Grappling arts have existed for millennia, and yet human beings continue to find new and exciting ways to fuck each other up. The latest example of mind-blowing grappling ingenuity comes to us from Cage Warriors 60 on Saturday, where a lightweight submission artist named Ivan “Buki” Buchinger tapped Mick Sinclair in the second round with a…well…it’s hard to say, really.

Sherdog ID’s the move as a “scarf-hold armlock,” which is basically true — and more descriptive than the ring-announcer’s vague claim of a “modified Americana” — but the positioning of Buchinger’s body, and the way that he sets up the hold by trapping Sinclair’s right arm with his legs before cranking on the neck makes this submission unique and kind of astounding.

Side note: Buchinger got his ass handed to him by Conor McGregor when they fought last December. But still, good sub, mate.

Previously: Omo-Peruvian-Necktwister Inventor Coty Shannon Hits a Sideways-Peruvian-Gogo-Bowtie in Second MMA Fight

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‘WTF?’ Video of the Year Candidate: Brazilian Fighter Quits Match by Jumping Out of Cage, Leaving Arena


(Props: Zona de Ataque)

OK, watch the above video and please tell us if you can figure out what in the Sam Hell just happened. Evilasio Silva and Claudinei Angelo met at JF Fight Evolution in Juiz de Fora, Brazil, on Saturday and things were going as MMA fights normally do — both men fighting inside an enclosed space — until, for some reason, Angelo decided he had had enough.

“When Angelo clearly spat his mouthpiece to recover from the punches, the referee refused to stop the fight,” wrote MMA Fighting’s Guilherme Cruz, who first brought this strange fight to our attention. “Angelo went on and asked for a ‘time out.’ Silva and [the referee] didn’t understand what he was asking for, but Angelo decided to quit. The door was locked, so his only way out was jumping off the fence and leaving the arena.”

And, he did. Now, we didn’t see the entire match and Cruz has more description of what happened before Angelo decided to hit splitsville, but it doesn’t seem as if the quitting fighter was upset about some supposed unrecognized fouls on the part of his opponent or anything like that.

Angelo simply broke free from the clinch, tried to call a time out by making the sign with his hands that is universally recognized in sports where participants are actually allowed to call time outs, tried to open up the cage, and when that failed, he climbed the chain-link and then walked out of the arena. As Angelo did that, boos cascaded down on him from the confused crowd.

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Classic UFC Fight: Cain Velasquez Beats Bejesus Out of Brock Lesnar, Wins Heavyweight Title


(Fight starts at the 3:03 mark. Props: YouTube.com/UFC)

With UFC heavyweight champion Cain Velasquez set to make his Octagon return next month at UFC 166, the UFC has released the video of his first-ever title fight, which took place at UFC 121 on October 23rd, 2010. His opponent that night was Brock Lesnar, the reigning champ who had proven his toughness the previous July with a classic comeback win against Shane Carwin. Lesnar was gigantic, athletic, and had legit talent as a wrestler. To stand a chance at winning, Velasquez would need to be faster, more efficient with his striking, and more willing to take abuse before giving it back. And that’s exactly what happened.

After some rather hoarse-voiced introductions from The Buff, Lesnar bull-rushes the smaller challenger right away, hoping to establish himself as alpha-male. And it actually works, at first. Brock stuffs some knees into Velasquez’s midsection (including a flying knee), and Cain has to retreat momentarily. He storms back with some punches but Lesnar responds by nailing a takedown and landing on top — a position that had spelled doom for the majority of his past opponents. But Cain gets to his feet immediately.

Brock struggles to put Velasquez’s back on the mat once again, and momentarily succeeds, but Velasquez is up even quicker the second time, and deftly escapes Lesnar’s grasp. It’s here that the momentum shifts. Velasquez begins popping Lesnar with punches, showing off his significant advantage in striking technique, before single-legging Lesnar to the mat and firing down some punches from above as Lesnar is turtled. Eventually he escapes to his feet, but he looks much worse for the wear, hunched over, dazed, swatting at Velasquez in panic.

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