Steroids in MMA
Which MMA Fighter Will Test Positive For Steroids Next?

Tag: MMA vs. boxing

CagePotato Ban: Any Further Discussion of Ronda Rousey vs. Floyd Mayweather, At All


This has got to stop, you guys.

It has been 11 days since Ronda Rousey made her last title defense: a 34-second blitzkrieging of Bethe Correia at UFC 190. Eleven. Yet we still can’t stop talking about her.

Let me take that back a step. It’s not our inability to stop talking about her that is so frustrating — why would it be? She’s as charismatic and captivating a presence as we could ever hope for in our sport — it’s that we can’t stop talking about her for all the wrong reasons. Sure, she’s quite possibly the most dominant female athlete of all time, a budding movie star, a bestselling author, a marketing dynamo, a feminist icon, and an inspiration to an entire generation of new fans, but what we really need to know is: Could she beat Floyd Mayweather in a fight? How about Bryan Caraway? The resurrected corpse of Chief Jay Strongbow, maybe? 

Just two days after Rousey’s win over Correia, Fox Sports ran with the above story. The author, Clay Travis, was wholeheartedly sold on the idea of having Ronda Rousey fight Floyd Mayweather because:

1.) It would make soooo much money, you guys

2.) The fans want to see it

3.) Rousey would probably win, which, yay! since Mayweather’s a d-bag

And truth be told, it’s hard to argue with any of Travis’ points, at least at face value. Rousey vs. Mayweather would almost certainly shatter pay-per-view records, and yeah, who wouldn’t want to see a convicted domestic abuser get his comeuppance at the hands of a woman? It’s that Jennifer Lopez movie come to life, y’all! (Matter of fact, can we have Rousey fight J-Lo after she’s through with Floyd? It would sell billions! BILL-YUNS!!!)

But here’s the problem with booking a fight between the greatest boxer of all time and a woman, aside from what I just typed: It’s short-sighted, hypocritical, unintentionally misogynistic, and completely asinine.


Blatant Troll Job of the Day: Floyd Mayweather “Looks Forward” to Putting on His First MMA Show

(Photo via

Floyd Mayweather and MMA: a duo as complementary and universally beloved as peanut butter and motor oil. It seems as if “Money” has been teasing a crossover to mixed martial arts (in one capacity or another) for close to a decade now, with MMA fans and media members lapping up his every word like it was a dog dish full of Beyonce’s booty sweat. Because surely, a man who earns a greater payday in one boxing match than the UFC’s entire roster does in a year (exaggeration?) needs “the world’s fastest growing sport” to get dat premo Fight Pass dough.

But like I said, us MMA bloggers love to talk about old Floyd, no matter how obvious, apparent, or a third synonym it is that he’s trolling us. Take his recent interview with Fight Hype magazine, for instance, in which Mayweather discusses how he is, like, totally going to host an MMA event soon. For realz. Third person narrative abounds:

We believe in treating our boxers and our MMA fighters fair. I want a lot of MMA fighters to get in touch with you because Mayweather Promotions, I look forward to putting on my first MMA show also and having me some MMA champions. Like I said before, Floyd Mayweather loves to think outside the box. We’re not just one-dimensional. We’re very versatile, and we have an open mind. When I get into the MMA game, I want them to make more money than they’re making because from what I hear, they’re not being treated fair. 

You hear that, broke fighters and MMA agents? Floyd Mayweather will treat you fairly, because Floyd Mayweather is a kind, compassionate human being (exceptions: former employees, security guards, the mother of his children).


CagePotato Ban: MMA Fighters Trying to Box Roy Jones Jr. (and Vice Versa)

(Ariel Helwani breaks the news of this potential freak show on MMA Tonight.)

Alright, enough is enough.

For what seems like a decade now, Roy Jones Jr. has been making it his life’s pursuit to box an MMA fighter. First it was Anderson Silva, then it was Nick Diaz, then Rampage Jackson, and finally, Anderson Silva again. And maybe Kimbo Slice in there somewhere. For Christ’s sake, when we first reported on this, Old Dad was a contributor here. Think about that for a second.

And now, it’s being reported that retired UFC veteran Chris “Lights Out” Lytle is currently in negotiations to box Jones in a 10-round, 175-pound contest later this year. That’s right, ten-time bonus winner and one-time Indiana State Senate hopeful Chris Lytle, is going to box Roy Jones Jr.

Even as a big fan of Lytle’s, I cannot understand how this fight is possibly being considered. Lytle retired from MMA in 2011, has not boxed professionally since 2005, and is easily the smallest draw of any of the MMA fighters Jones has been linked to over the years. Say what you want about Lytle’s granite chin, or how much Jones’ skills have deteriorated, or how Lytle was 13-1 as a boxer with wins over…

This shit needs to stop. News flash, MMA fighters & Boxers: It isn’t 1993, and there is no longer a need to prove that one fighting style is better than another. We already know that MMA is superior, we know this, so why are we as a community so insistent on leveling the scales that were tipped in our favor following Toney vs. Couture? THIS IS WHY WE CAN’T HAVE NICE THINGS, YOU GUYS.


Rousey vs. Mayweather: The MMA vs. Boxing Debate Finally Hits Rock-Bottom

(Joe Rogan talks Rousey vs. Mayweather on ESPN’s SportsNation, because it’s not like there was an actual event worth discussing or anything.)

By Jared Jones

I must be confused.

You see, when I awoke yesterday morning, I was under the impression that MMA was still a sport with plenty of goings-on worth talking about, not a platform so desolate of intriguing discussion that its only current purpose in this world was to push energy drinks and stir up farcical “Who would win?” scenarios like a goddamn episode of Deadliest Warrior. “There are *two* UFC events alone going down this week,” I said to myself, “Not to mention an *actual* TUF premiere, a Bellator event, and who knows what else. Surely there is plenty of real-life, newsworthy information to be had today.”

So you can imagine my surprise when I awoke to find “Joe Rogan says Ronda Rousey would beat Floyd Mayweather Jr.” as the headline dominating many an MMA site and even some that aren’t. And even worse, nearly all of these articles were flooded with the hundreds of comments from people who actually found it necessary to offer their insight into this absolutely imbecilic piece of non-news. (Rousey vs. a cheetah in sweatpants: Who’s the better dancer?”)

“Every fight starts standing, and we all know Floyd’s not afraid to hit women,” joked a commenter who vehemently expressed his outrage over the idea of allowing Fallon Fox to continue fighting just months earlier. “Floyd’s speed would be no match for Ronda’s armbar,” said another who had chastised his favorite MMA publication for daring to waste his time with a breakdown of the Undertaker’s signature move days prior.

I bit my tongue at first, because I don’t exactly have a foot to stand on when it comes to publishing news items that are ever-so-tangentially related to MMA. But the tipping point occurred during last night’s TUF Nations Finale broadcast, when during yet another time-killing session in the FOX studios, Karyn Bryant posed the same question to Daniel Cormier and Anthony Pettis.

“This is ridiculous,” said Pettis before declaring that Floyd would easily win. Unfortunately, it appeared that the idea of a woman beating a man in a fight was what Pettis found ridiculous, not the question itself as I had hoped.


Confusing the Enemy: What MMA Needs to Learn From the Precedent of Boxing

(“So if you win, your salary doubles from $22,000 to $44,000? And if it’s the best fight on the card, they give you a $50,000 bonus? Wow. That’s adorable, man.”)

By Brian J. D’Souza

Floyd Mayweather Jr.’s record $41.5 million guarantee for facing Canelo Alvarez in September elicited a series of reactions from the MMA community. Some fighters like Tito Ortiz made ridiculous comparisons (“What am I doing different from [Floyd Mayweather Jr.]?”). Others, like current UFC light-heavyweight champion Jon Jones knew it was more politically expedient to downplay any direct comparison between revenues in boxing and MMA (“Boxing has been around over 100 years…The foundation is set and the money is there. MMA is so new.”). But the question looms large — why is it that boxing can boast stratospheric paydays whereas MMA’s purses are deliberately obscured from public knowledge?

We could talk about the structure of modern boxing where there is competition between promoters (Bob Arum, Golden Boy, etc.) and TV networks (HBO, Showtime, etc.), which drives boxing purses up. Or we could focus on the formula for self-promoting fights that Oscar de la Hoya and Floyd Mayweather Jr. derived tremendous benefit from. The fact remains that with its limited 20-year history, MMA has much more in common with the monopolistic and mafia-controlled boxing of the 1950s and ‘60s than it does with modern boxing.

What the industry tends to ignore is that the passage of time is not what leads to progress. It was five years ago in 2008 that Jon Fitch was tossed overboard by the UFC for refusing to sign away his likeness rights away in perpetuity. While managers and fighters could have drawn a line in the sand, squared up with Zuffa and said “You’ve taken enough from us,” their response to the likeness rights situation was completely muted.

“That wasn’t a battle we chose to fight. All of our guys agreed,” said American Top Team president Dan Lambert.

Thus, the precedent was set. MMA managers acting out of fear negotiated with the UFC by giving up something in exchange for nothing.


Bold Statement of the Day: Junior Dos Santos Could Beat Both Klitschkos — In Boxing! — With a Four-Month Camp

(Dos Santos went on to claim that Hayden Panettiere “could get it.” / Photo via Getty)

It’s no big mystery why MMA fighters from Anderson Silva to Quinton Jackson have voiced their desires to transition into boxing. For one thing, the potential paydays are bigger. (In theory at least, though not necessarily for guys like Silva and Rampage, who aren’t draws in boxing.) Also, there’s no chance that a half-feral Brazilian will tear your knee off in a boxing match. I’m not saying that boxing is easier than MMA, but you don’t have to worry about takedown defense, and nobody expects you to cut 25 pounds of water to be “competitive.” Sounds like a vacation compared to what MMA fighters have to go through.

But of course, boxing and MMA are completely different sports, being great at one doesn’t mean you’d be great at the other, blah blah blah, etc. I mean you’d have to be a total fucking moron to think you can just cross the combat sports Mason-Dixon line and start beating champions, right? Right?? Well somebody needs to send that memo to UFC heavyweight title contender Junior Dos Santos, who just threw down the gauntlet in facepalm-worthy fashion, claiming that he has the skills to beat Wladimir Klitschko and Vitali Klitschko at their own game.

“I think if they give me four months to get prepared, I can beat them,” Dos Santos said on The MMA Hour yesterday. “In the beginning of my all my camps, I do just boxing. I love to train boxing and I think I have enough skills in boxing. I know how to see a good fight. Four months, that’s what I need.”


MMA vs. Boxing, Chapter DXXIV: In Which Adrien Broner Attacks Our Sport Using Good Science [UPDATED]

What’s that, you say? An arrogant, classless boxer trashing MMA using the logic of a medieval squire? Surely you must be mistaken.

When we last checked in on undefeated boxer Adrien Broner, he was casually flushing 20 dollar bills down a Popeye’s toilet. So clearly, the man is a well-studied, soft-spoken individual whose opinion should carry a lot of weight in this world. Take for instance, the argument he presented when recently questioned about whether or not he interacts with MMA fighters.

“No. It’s just, I really don’t look at it as a real sport,” said Broner through his double set of platinum grills, “Cause anybody can come into MMA and learn that. You can’t just come over in boxing and be a world champion. You gotta be born with it.”

Broner then told the interviewer that, “You right now can go to MMA and learn all the submission moves and be a world champion. It don’t matter how long it would take. I don’t give a fuck what you do, you could try to come over here in boxing and you won’t EVER be a world champion.”


Report: Rampage Jackson vs. Roy Jones Jr. Slated for Year-End Boxing Match

(“…and as part of your signing bonus, we’re going to hook you up with a tricked-out, 2014 stretch Winnebago.” Photo props: Bellator MMA via

Quinton “Rampage” Jackson is becoming quite the utility player for Viacom. With his Bellator MMA debut looming in the future and his TNA wrestling career already underway, Rampage is about to add boxing to his list of duties. And we’re not talking about beating up some random cans in Oklahoma — the former UFC/PRIDE star will reportedly be fighting none other than multi-divisional boxing champ Roy Jones Jr., as part of a pay-per-view event targeted for the end of the year. As MMAJunkie reports:

Viacom is expected to announce plans to go head-to-head with pay-per-view juggernaut Zuffa LLC and its UFC 168 offering at next week’s Bellator 97 event on Spike TV.

An unveiling of Bellator fighter Quinton “Rampage” Jackson’s plans with the promotion will likely include a pay-per-view boxing match with former multi-division boxing champ Roy Jones Jr., multiple sources close to the event today told (

The fight is expected to take place at the end of the year, though a date and weight class for the bout could not immediately be confirmed. It’s also unclear how the event will be branded given Bellator and parent company Viacom’s focus on MMA.

“We’ve been talking to Roy and his people over a potential ‘Rampage’ vs. Roy fight for over seven months,” a representative from Jackson’s longtime team, Wolfslair MMA, told The rep requested anonymity due to the ongoing negotiations related to the matchup.

“If it happens, it would be an incredible fight,” the rep said. “Boxing and MMA have both been discussed, and (Bellator Chairman and CEO) Bjorn (Rebney) has been in these discussions every step of the way. I can’t say much more than that. We’ll see what happens.”

Bellator MMA officials declined to comment on the possible event.

Alright, two things…


MMA vs. Boxing, Chapter CXVII: In Which Conor McGregor and Adrien Broner Challenge Our Perceptions of What is Baller

(We may give DW a lot of shit around here but, damn, this sure beats the hell out of casual Friday.)

Although closed-minded enthusiasts on both sides of the fence would scoff at the idea of being compared to the other, there’s no denying the sibling rivalry that exists between Boxing and MMA. Like brothers, we bicker, we call each other “homos,” we even butt heads a time or two. But at the end of the day, we look at each other with a mutual sense of respect, if not admiration…for the most part. Still, that blood feud friendly sense of competition is ever-present.

With that in mind, we come to yet another crossroads in the Boxing vs. MMA debate: “Which sport’s athletes know how to celebrate in style MORE BETTER?”

The only reason we ask is because former welfare recipient turned UFC star and 50′s Ice Cream Shoppe owner, Conor McGregor, recently posted the above video depicting himself and UFC President Dana White touring the streets of Vegas in The Baldfather’s Ferrari. According to a tweet sent out by DW, the duo were celebrating McGregor’s birthday and looked to be having a smashing good time (*fires up trumpet, shimmies off stage*). Considering McGregor’s humble beginnings, it’s great to see the kid racking up KOTN bonuses in the UFC worth more than my annual salary. It just…sooogreat.

And while there’s no denying how baller custom tailored suits and Ferraris are, do they match up with, say, the antics of WBA welterweight champion Adrien Broner? Join us after the jump to see what we mean.


[VIDEO] Former Boxing Champion Ricardo Mayorga Wins (?) MMA Debut

Ten years ago, Nicauraguan boxer Ricardo Mayorga made headlines with two surprising wins over Vernon Forrest and his unique brand of arrogance complete with trash talk and post-fight, in-ring cigarette smoking. As most all champions eventually do, however, Mayorga would go on to lose and lose frequently.

He was in wars, got beat up and stayed probably boxed on for longer than was healthy. And then, he started talking shit about MMA and picking (verbally, at least) fights with its competitors. There was the Din Thomas fight that never happened and lots of ignorant talk before and after the non-event from Mayorga.

Well, the boxer finally got his MMA bout in yesterday and it was a strange one. Through two rounds, Mayorga got taken down, mounted and controlled easily. However, after defending a triangle choke attempt from his opponent, Mayorga landed a nice lil knee to his foe’s back that – by the guy’s reaction – must have been a dim mak or something.