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The Plot Thickens: Jon Jones’ Test Results Also Reveal Abnormal T/E Ratios, Hormone Levels [UPDATED]

While there’s been a lot of hubbub (rightfully) made about Jon Jones’ positive test for cocaine and the Nevada State Athletic Commission’s subsequent bumblefucking of his case, it’s taken (some of) us a couple days to see another, perhaps greater abnormality in Jones’ sample. Also, I just used hubbub and bumblefuck in the same sentence and probably deserve some kind of award for that.

As you already know, Jones’ two tests on December 4th both came back positive for traces of cocaine metabolites, with his follow-up test on the 18th coming back clean. All three tests, however, showed significantly lower than usual levels of testosterone, which for a young athlete of Jones’ level is unusual to say the very least.

Jones’ first test (the “watery” sample) is pictured above. As you can see, Jones’ testosterone levels measured at 59ng/dL, and his epitestosterone levels measured at 170ng/dL. This raises several red flags, as the range for epitestosterone is usually similar to that of testosterone (hence the 1:1 T/E ratio that is considered normal). Jones’ second and third tests are after the jump.

Now, there are a few possible explanations as to why Jones’ T/E ratio could come back so abnormal…


With Jon Jones’ Cocaine Scandal, the Nevada State Athletic Commission Once Again Shines a Light On Their Own Incompetence

(Yeah, that’s pretty much all we can do at this point.)

As you might expect, the news of Jon Jones’ positive test for cocaine did not come without its fair share of questions from both fans and media members, questions like “Why wasn’t Jones punished prior to UFC 182?”, “Will he be punished now?” and “If cocaine isn’t banned out-of-competition, why was he tested for it in the first place?” And those are all sensible questions that the Nevada State Athletic Commission would love to answer. The problem is, none of them can seem to get their stories straight.

Where to begin, where to begin. I guess we should start with the date that NSAC was made aware of Jones’ test failure, which according to NSAC chairman Francisco Aguilar in an exclusive statement made to MMAFighting, was “around” December 23rd. While the UFC was informed shortly thereafter, Jones was not made aware of his positive test until two days after his fight with Cormier, for whatever reason. The UFC has declined to share their timeline of events in this matter, which isn’t sketchy in the least bit.

As to why Jones was being tested for cocaine in the first place? Well, it starts to get really, really murky there…


Vitor Belfort Passed His Random Drug Test! Good Job, Vitor!

(Would you expect anything less from the UFC’s most trusted Values Enforcer?)

Earlier this month, the Nevada State Athletic Commission finally got off its collective ass and subjected UFC middleweight contender Vitor Belfort to a random drug test — his first since being granted a conditional license in July. Well, the results are back, and in the case of 37-year-old Vitor…he is NOT currently using performance enhancing drugs!

ESPN reported yesterday that Belfort passed the blood and urine test that he submitted at the request of the NSAC on November 1st, coming up negative for all banned substances. Belfort’s blood serum testosterone levels were also within normal range. According to NSAC executive director Bob Bennett, the UFC paid for the cost of Belfort’s test.

Vitor Belfort is currently scheduled to challenge Chris Weidman for the UFC middleweight title in the main event of UFC 184, February 28th in Los Angeles. “The Phenom” is expected to undergo further random drug-testing by the California State Athletic Commission prior to the match.


By the Way, Nevada Finally Drug-Tested Vitor Belfort

(Photo via Getty)

Yahoo!’s Kevin Iole reported this weekend that the Nevada State Athletic Commission subjected UFC middleweight title contender Vitor Belfort to a random drug test on Saturday — his first such test since being granted a conditional license in Nevada on July 23rd. According to the Yahoo! report, a collector representing the Nevada commission took blood and urine samples from Belfort in Florida, where the fighter currently lives and trains.

Belfort was cooperative with the procedure, and did not attempt to escape out the side door of his gym like some people we know. Results from Belfort’s test will not be ready for approximately two weeks. (Suspense!)

Nevada’s decision to finally drop a rando on Belfort followed a public shaming led by Chris Weidman and MMA news outlets like us, who screamed at the NSAC to do its damn job after it came out that the Nevada commission wasn’t testing Belfort like it had promised in the wake of his failed drug test for elevated testosterone back in February. However, NSAC executive director Bob Bennett told Yahoo! Sports that he had always planned to have Belfort tested — it just took a bit longer than we expected.

Belfort will challenge Chris Weidman for the UFC middleweight title at UFC 184 on February 28th in Los Angeles.


Great Job, Nevada!: Robert Drysdale Finally Handed Down Suspension For Failed Drug Test at TUF 19 Finale

(“You have brought great shame upon your chest hair on this day, Mr. Drysdale.” — Brian Ebersole. Photo via MMAJunkie)

When we last checked in with the Nevada State Athletic Commission’s crack team of regulators, we learned that they had yet to drug test middleweight contender/former TRT user/former steroid cheat Vitor Belfort since relicensing him on July 23rd. That NSAC commissioner Anthony Marnell had promised to test Belfort “until the day he retired” before immediately shirking the responsibility to the California State Athletic Commission probably should have come as a big surprise to us. Yet it did not.

And for our second installment of “Great Job, Nevada!”, we return to July, which was apparently a pretty busy month for the NSAC. Aside from the whole Vitor Belfort re-licensing issue, they had to deal with Kevin Casey and Robert Drysdale, who tested positive for drostanolone and elevated testosterone, respectively, at UFC 175 and the TUF 19 Finale (respectfully). While Casey was hit with a $5,600 fine and a year-long suspension almost immediately, Drysdale’s case was pushed back for whatever reason, despite the the fact that it had been his second-such failed test in less than two fights under the UFC banner.

In any case, the word has been handed down and it looks like Drysdale is destined to become one of those “what could’ve been”-type fighters…


Great Job, Nevada!: Vitor Belfort Has Been Drug Tested Exactly Zero Times Since Being Re-Licensed by NSAC

(Well, the visual evidence is definitely on Belfort’s side.)

Back in July, UFC middleweight Vitor Belfort went before the Nevada State Athletic Commission to answer for his failed drug test for elevated testosterone in February. It went pretty well, which is completely unsurprising since a big-money fight against Chris Weidman hung in the balance. Belfort was given a conditional license, and his title challenge against Weidman was immediately booked for December 6th in Las Vegas.

But NSAC commissioner Anthony Marnell left Belfort with this dire warning: “[W]e’re going to drug test you to the day you retire…We, in my opinion, should be in and around your career until the day you call it quits.”

Hell yeah! Nevada is gonna be up in them guts, son! [Ed. note: Gross.]

Except, no, not really. The truth is, Belfort hasn’t been drug-tested at all (!) since July 23rd, and the NSAC has no intention of testing him before his fight against Weidman, since that fight will now likely take place in California in late February at UFC 184. MMAFighting’s Ariel Helwani breaks it:

On Wednesday, spoke to NAC executive director Bob Bennett, who said he currently has no plans in place to randomly test Belfort because the UFC recently informed the commission that the Weidman vs. Belfort fight would probably take place in California next year. (Note: the UFC has yet to publicly announce the official date and location of the title fight, however, UFC president Dana White recently said it would happen in February.) Bennett also said the commission had yet to test Belfort, despite the fact that the title fight was official for two months before Weidman had to pull out. Weidman confirmed he had not been tested, as well.

Bennett was confident that California State Athletic Commission executive officer Andy Foster “will spearhead” the Belfort testing, if the fight does in fact end up in California.


Wanderlei Silva to Appeal Lifetime Ban Handed Down By “Kangaroo Court” NSAC

(For just the price of a cup of coffee a day, you can help this child AFFORD A FIGHT PASS SUBSCRIPTION TO WATCH VINTAGE WANDERLEI SILVA KICK SOME ASS! HYEAAHHH!!!)

As we’ve mentioned before, Wanderlei Silva has been hopelessly trapped in a world of delusion ever since skipping out on his random pre-fight drug test prior to UFC 175. And although he announced his retirement from the sport prior to yesterday’s NSAC meeting wherein he was handed a lifetime ban/$70,000 fine – a meeting that he didn’t even bother attending, mind you – it appears that Silva will forge ahead in his near impossible quest for redemption. The horror, the horror.

Moments after Silva was handed his punishment, Josh Gross reported that Silva would in fact be repealing the verdict within 30 days through attorney Ross Goodman, who referred to the NSAC as a “kangaroo court” (presumably before dropping the mic and peacing out that bitch). Goodman’s assessment was not entirely ungrounded, as Chuck Mindenhall pointed out in his hilarious write-up of yesterday’s proceedings.

And now, Silva is attempting to rally support from what few fans he has left via the social medias, recently sending out a series of tweets that translated to (via BloodyElbow):

Thank you my friends, you got the power and you give it for whoever you want. Thank you very much for everything. And for you that desire my fall, come to me, the war is only in the beginning you sons of bitches. You’re going to see that we rule this shit. Bunch of fops.

I’ll give Wanderlei this, the man has a surprisingly diverse vocabulary for a guy who spends the majority of his free time shooting black-and-white vlogs set to bro rock in his basement.


NSAC BLOODBATH: Jon Jones and Daniel Cormier Hit With Fines and Community Service, Wanderlei Silva Gets Lifetime Ban at Disciplinary Hearing

(Yes, this is the actual poster image used to promote the stream on Fight Pass, and not the cover of a jazz album. MMA is the greatest circus in the entire world.)

Today was Judgement Day for a trio of misbehaving UFC stars, as the Nevada State Athletic Commission held a disciplinary hearing today to address the infamous Jon Jones vs. Daniel Cormier media day brawl in August, as well as Wanderlei Silva‘s equally-infamous dodging of a random drug test in May. Let’s get the important stuff out of the way first — the punishments:

- Jon Jones was fined $50,000 for his role in the brawl, which is 10% of his disclosed purse for his upcoming fight against Cormier in January. He will also be required to complete 40 hours of community service in Las Vegas; Jones is not psyched about that part, as he feels it will impact his training for the fight.

- Daniel Cormier was fined $9,000, which is 10% of his disclosed purse for his upcoming fight against Jones. Cormier will be required to complete 20 hours of community service in his hometown of San Jose, CA. The Nevada Commission felt that Cormier had less responsibility in the brawl — despite the fact that Cormier’s shove set it off — and gave DC a smaller community service requirement as a result.

- The newly-retired Wanderlei Silva has received a lifetime ban and a $70,000 fine, which represents 35% of the $200,000 purse he was expected to earn at UFC 175. NSAC board member Anthony Marnell wanted to take the whole thing.

Here’s what else you missed, if you didn’t watch the Fight Pass stream…


Jon Jones and Daniel Cormier Won’t Be Punished for Press Conference Brawl Any Time Soon

(Such a shame. Did our #JusticeForSholler hashtag accomplish *nothing*?)

In today’s installment of “the Nevada State Athletic Commission is a total clown show,” NSAC officials have confirmed that last Monday’s press conference brawl between Jon Jones and Daniel Cormier won’t be addressed at its next meeting on August 21st.

“The incident between Jones and Cormier will not be on the agenda for the commission meeting this month,” NSAC Executive Director Bob Bennett told MMAjunkie yesterday. “If and when it does, I will let you know.”

Directly following the brawl, NSAC chair Francisco Aguilar wrote, “It’s too premature for us to comment, considering we were not there. Upon review of the video and follow up questions, we can make an assessment.” Ten days later, it’s apparently still too premature to comment; they must be super-busy over there. Still, I guess taking no action is better than immediately firing a guy before even looking at the tape.

With Jones vs. Cormier now postponed to January, this would have been the perfect opportunity for the NSAC to give the fighters an utterly meaningless four-month suspension that would expire before the fight was scheduled. But they’re not even doing that. Like I said before, being a superstar with a fight coming up makes you untouchable.

Related: Jon Jones Apologizes to Fans, Slated to Undergo Surgery on Injured Leg


Chael Sonnen Still Plans on Showing Up to Metamoris 4 on Saturday, Despite NSAC Threats

(Galvao may have the accolades, but he’s never dealt with an elite-level oil-check artist like Sonnen. /Photo via Sherdog)

Chael Sonnen’s jiu-jitsu coach Fabiano Scherner confirmed to last night that Sonnen will indeed travel to Los Angeles for his scheduled headliner against Andre Galvao at the Metamoris 4 grappling event on Saturday. Sonnen runs the risk of being fined hundreds of thousands of dollars from the Nevada State Athletic Commission, for violating his two-year suspension from competition. But as the man himself put it…

(Sonnen’s twitter bio still describes him as “Godfather of integrity.” Awesome.)

It should be pointed out that the NSAC’s ability to fine Sonnen for competing in a grappling competition in California is still a major point of contention. Earlier this month, Sonnen’s lawyer Ross Goodman sent NSAC chairman Francisco Aguilar a letter explaining why a jiu-jitsu competition doesn’t fall under the commission’s jurisdiction:

The term ‘unarmed combat’ is defined in NRS 467.0107 as ‘boxing or any form of competition in which a blow is usually struck which may reasonably be expected to inflict injury. There is no dispute that the NSAC has no jurisdiction or authority to regulate, license or sanction jiu-jitsu and other forms of grappling. Moreover, jiu-jitsu does not fall within the Nevada definition of unarmed combat because it does not involve “blows” of any kind. Likewise, it would be a violation of due process to expand the interpretation of ‘fighting’ broader than the statutory definition of unarmed combat