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21 Humans Who Make Being Human Look Really, Really Hard

Tag: PEDs

MMA’s Catch-22 Drug Trap: Why So Many Fighters Fall Into Addiction


(MMA competition can provide the stability necessary for a person to beat addiction. It can also create the physical and emotional chaos that leads to drugs in the first place.)

By Santino DeFranco

For months I’ve wanted to get started on an article discussing drug use among MMA athletes, but just haven’t gotten my fingers to the keyboard. For some reason, after seeing Dennis Siver’s positive test for HCG recently — probably the least worrisome drug I’ve ever seen someone test positive for — I’ve decided to get going with it.

In addition to the positive tests for performance enhancing substances that we’ve seen dozens of times in this sport, there has been an alarming number of positive drug tests for recreational and prescription drugs as well. We’ve also seen countless fighters wage personal battles with substance abuse outside of the ring/cage, with several ending in death — accidental as well as suicide. It’s the recreational drugs and prescription painkillers that have caught my attention as something that may need to be addressed.

After seeing so many fighters struggle with drug abuse over the years like Joe Riggs, Drew Fickett, Karo Parisyan, along with those that have passed away from drug-related circumstances like Shane Del Rosario and Shelby Walker, I started to wonder: Is MMA leading athletes to become addicted to drugs, or are people who are more prone to drug use entering the world of mixed martial arts?

What I found out is that the answer to both previous questions is yes. Those more prone to use drugs do enter MMA, and MMA in return, leads those to use drugs and subsequently become addicted to them. It’s a hell of a lot more complex than that, but simply put, MMA fighters, as well as boxers, are kind of screwed.

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Jon Jones Isn’t Saying Glover Teixeira Is a Steroid-User…But Why Take Any Chances?


(Jones is so committed to clean competition that he carries a bottle of fresh, hot urine with him at all times. / Photo via Getty)

Earlier this month, Jon Jones revealed to FOX Sports that he requested random drug-testing for himself and Glover Teixeira in advance of their light-heavyweight title fight at UFC 172 (April 26th, Baltimore). At the time, it seemed like Jones was taking up the Anti-PED Superhero mantle from Georges St-Pierre.

“It was something me and my management team asked for several months ago,” Jones said. “We thought it would be great to make sure everyone was playing fair in this fight. I’m not accusing my opponent of anything, but it’d just be great to see. [The Maryland State Athletic Commission] said they would need the UFC to approve it, the UFC approved it and paid for the whole thing and they never told me or Glover when our tests would come…

“I just think it’d be great to know that the athletes that are competing are competing clean,” Jones said. “I’ve never taken any kind of performance-enhancing drug and I don’t think any of my opponents should. I know that I’ve probably fought people in the past that have, and I’ve still come up with a way to win, but I just think it’s important that it goes away.

“I want our sport to be a clean sport. I want athletes to have pride and hard work and that’s why I thought I would put my money where my mouth is and get the test for myself. I have no right to accuse [Teixeira] of being on anything,” Jones said. “I know when people get chances to fight for world titles maybe they’ll do anything to get an edge, and I think the only edge you should have is work ethic so I thought we should both get tested.”

Now, in a follow-up interview with ESPN’s Brett Okamoto, Jones explained what really motivated him to request enhanced testing for this fight, and it has nothing to do with any lofty goals of cleaning up the sport. Basically, Glover Teixeira is 34 years old, he’s strong as an ox, and Jones finds that kind of suspicious:

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Friday Link Dump: Belfort’s Mysterious Random Drug Test, Weidman Opens as 2-1 Favorite Over Machida, Eight Damn-Near-Impossible Video Games + More


(If you’re a Fight Pass subscriber…let us know how this fight turns out, alright? / Props: YouTube.com/UFC)

- Results of Vitor Belfort’s Random Drug Test Will Not Be Released Unless He Does so Himself (MMAFighting)

- Can Anybody Explain This Conor McGregor Billboard on Sunset Strip? (MiddleEasy)

- Zak Cummings Missed Weight So Bad That His ‘UFC Fight Night: Macau’ Match Was Canceled (BloodyElbow)

- Chris Weidman Opens as -210 Favorite Over Lyoto Machida in UFC 173 Title Fight (MMAJunkie)

- Matt Hughes: Georges St. Pierre Doesn’t Want to Come Back to UFC and Take Another Beating From Johny Hendricks (MMAMania)

- More Still Needs to Be Done in Struggle Against PED Use (Yahoo!)

- 2014 Oscar Nominee Childhood Photos (WorldWideInterweb)

- The 50 Greatest NBA Plays of the ’90s (Complex)

- 10 Ways to Cancer-Proof Your Life (MensFitness)

- Dazzle Your Oscar Party With These Printable Bingo Cards (Crushable)

- Eight Scripts That Should Have Never Made It to the Big Screen (EscapistMagazine)

- 20 Things That Happen When You Don’t Wear a Bra, In GIFs (TheGloss)

Eight Utterly Frustrating Video Games That You Could Never Beat (HolyTaco)

- Dana Snay Loses $80,000 with “SUCK IT” Facebook Message (EveryJoe)

- The Complete Cheat-Guide to ‘Thief’ (Gamefront)

- The Funniest Autocorrects of February 2014, Part One! (DamnYouAutocorrect)

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Quote of the Day: Anthony Johnson Has Nothing Against PEDs, As Long as You Don’t Kill Nobody


(Photo via Ryan Loco/Blackzilians)

Light-heavyweight slugger Anthony Johnson has been back in the UFC for less than a week, and already he’s courting controversy. During a recent interview with SiriusXM TapouT Radio, Johnson said he has no problem with performance-enhancing drug use in MMA — and seemed to argue in favor of responsible usage of PEDs. Here’s what he had to say (via MMAMania):

In every sport people are using something. I mean, as long as nobody dies, nobody pulls a Chris Benoit, you know what I’m saying? I think everything is going to be fine. If it’s something that can absolutely help you, I don’t see what the problem is. Until that moment you go crazy on the person — whoever it may be — you can’t absolutely blame the…I don’t know. I guess it’s just an iffy situation.”

If you abuse it, of course you are going to get popped for it and do stupid stuff. But if you use it the right way and you just do what you are supposed to do, then it shouldn’t be a problem…I think if you can do it, do it. I don’t have nothing against it. You know what I’m saying? As long as you don’t kill nobody.”

Of course, Johnson didn’t come out and say that he uses steroids or unapproved hormone therapy, though he indirectly cast suspicion on some of the UFC’s champions:

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The Unsupportable Opinion: Why PEDs Should Be Legal in MMA


(Can we go back to those innocent, joyful days when you didn’t give a damn about your favorite fighter’s T/E ratio? / Photo via MMAWeekly)

By Jon Mariani

Drugs are bad, m’kay? At least that’s the conventional wisdom regarding the use of performance enhancing drugs in mixed martial arts. For the past 12 years, state athletic commissions as well as the UFC have tried to combat steroid use (and hormone therapy abuse) through pre- and post-fight testing, and punitive measures like suspensions and fines.

Some would argue that commissions and promoters should go even further with their anti-PED efforts, enacting more stringent testing for athletes. We say, what’s the point? Why burn so much money and man-hours trying to eradicate a problem that can never be eradicated? Ultimately, it might be better for the sport if all MMA fighters were allowed to use PEDs. Seriously. Here’s why that might not be the worst idea in the world…

It Would Level the Playing Field

When asked what percentage of fighters in MMA currently use PEDs, the most conservative response is usually around 50% of fighters; on the other side of the spectrum, estimates from fighters themselves go as as high as 90%. If those numbers are to be trusted, that would mean the majority of fighters currently use PEDs. It makes sense that so many fighters are using considering how poor the current testing is.

The fighters who don’t use PEDs face a clear disadvantage when they step into the cage against opponents who do. There’s also the murky waters of testosterone replacement therapy hall passes, which are being given away like candy. Legalizing PEDs would mean that all fighters could use, which would mean fighters who would like to use but currently don’t because it’s illegal would get on the gear. For the first time since athletic commissions began drug-testing MMA fighters, competition would be truly fair.

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UPDATED: CagePotato’s MMA Steroid Bust Timeline, Now With Testosterone Busts


(Dammit, Chael. We can never stay mad at you. / Photo via Getty)

Since it was first published in July 2009, our MMA Steroid Busts: The Definitive Timeline feature has grown to become the Internet’s most complete history of fighter PED use — as well as the busted fighters’ resulting excuses. But with the recent rise of testosterone replacement therapy, things began to get complicated. Should the list include a fighter who got caught with a 20:1 T/E ratio, even if he didn’t test positive for a particular steroid? It’s become clear that testosterone abuse is the new Stanozolol and we’ll be talking about this issue for years to come, so to keep things nice and neat, we’ve decided to stick every failed drug test for elevated testosterone on page 2 of the timeline.

Separating the testosterone busts into their own group revealed this damning statistic: “Of the aforementioned fighters who tested positive for elevated testosterone after fights, 1 was successful in those fights, while 4 were unsuccessful.” It’s too early to draw any hard conclusions, but TRT abuse may turn out to be the most useless unfair advantage in all of MMA.

Check out the new testosterone busts page of the Steroid Bust Timeline right here, and please let us know if we’ve forgotten any.

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Rousimar Palhares Almost Looks Like a Normal Human Being Now [PHOTO]


(Photo via Globo/Reddit)

Tomorrow night, former middleweight Rousimar Palhares makes his 170-pound debut against Mike Pierce on the main card of UFC Fight Night 29, following a nine-month suspension for elevated testosterone. Palhares’s failed drug test surprised nobody — we’re talking about a dude who sported one of the most unrealistic builds in UFC history, whose biceps strained the boundaries of believability. Now preparing for his first fight at welterweight, we’ve finally gotten a glimpse at what Palhares looks like without power pills, and it’s…weird.

He looks unnaturally bare, like a hairless cat. He looks like he lost his traps in a car accident. He looks like his head grew two sizes. He looks like he skipped leg day. He looks kind of sad. He looks like a normal human being, and I’m not prepared for it. First a skinny Roy Nelson, and now this? It’s too much. I’m going to go lie down for a while.

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Lavar Johnson Has a Rather Bizarre Explanation for That Failed Drug Test of His


(Awwwwwwwww yeeeaaaaaah. GIF via TheBigLead)

Lavar Johnson‘s once-promising UFC career ended in the least respectable way possible: a boring lay-and-pray loss at the hands of Brendan Schaub at UFC 157, followed by a failed drug test for elevated testosterone, which resulted in Johnson’s release from the promotion and a nine-month suspension from the California State Athletic Commission. But according to “Big,” his botched test wasn’t the result of your everyday anabolic steroid use. The truth is, Johnson got on testosterone replacement therapy in the lead-up to the fight, as a way to combat fatigue and repeated injuries in training, but didn’t disclose it to the CSAC because he figured he’d get away with it. See? Totally different than cheating. As he explained yesterday on The MMA Hour:

What happened was basically I was on TRT, I just didn’t disclose it to the athletic commission. It was my mistake. I was taking such little amounts; me and my doctor didn’t think anything was going to pop up, like it’s no big deal. I guess any time you’re taking any kind of testosterone it’s going to show on the test. So that’s basically what I got popped for.

You know, if you take steroids they’ll suspend you for a year. I wasn’t taking steroids. I was prescribed [TRT] by a doctor. They suspended me for nine months, and I ended up showing them my prescription from my doctor and everything. They ended up reducing it to six months. That was it. Unfortunately I got released from the UFC, and messed up the good opportunity.”

Two questions immediately come to mind: 1) Who the hell is Lavar Johnson’s doctor? He “didn’t think anything was going to pop up, like it’s no big deal”? “I guess any time you’re taking any kind of testosterone it’s going to show on the test”?? Are you fucking kidding me? What did they think was going to happen to Johnson’s testosterone levels when he started taking TRT?

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George St. Pierre’s Anti-Doping Crusade Falls Apart, And Makes Him Look Bad in the Process


(“Lift these ten-pound dumbbells for just 20 minutes a day, and all your friends will think you’re on steroids — guaranteed.” / Props: GSP RUSHFIT)

In July, UFC welterweight champion Georges St. Pierre called out his UFC 167 opponent Johny Hendricks to undergo random, unannounced drug-testing with him through the Voluntary Anti-Doping Association (VADA), during the eight weeks before their fight. Though Hendricks’s initial response was “Heck ya!“, we didn’t hear a peep about GSP’s new anti-doping campaign/publicity stunt — until reports came out last week that Hendricks still hadn’t filed his paperwork.

According to a new report on MMAJunkie, St. Pierre will indeed go forward with enhanced drug testing conducted by VADA and will be tested by the Nevada State Athletic Commission, while Hendricks will only participate in the NSAC’s testing. Hendricks’s apparent refusal to cooperate with the VADA program raised our suspicions at first, but it turns out there’s another side to the story, and it’s one that paints the champ in an unflattering light.

St. Pierre and Hendricks’s gentlemen’s agreement about additional drug-testing began to fall apart when Hendricks’s manager Ted Ehrhardt discovered that VADA would be paying for GSP’s testing, contradicting St. Pierre’s initial claim that he would be paying for the testing of both fighters out of his own pocket. (“Hendricks’ camp balked at the idea of their opponent partnering with a drug testing body that was supposed to be independent, and they favored the WADA program,” writes Junkie.)

A conference call was arranged to sort it out, and that’s when things got complicated:

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Baseball’s Latest Steroid Mega-Scandal Could Extend to MMA Fighters and Boxers as Well

MMA steroids out of competition drug testing NSAC nevada
(Awful clip-art via SportsNickel)

If you follow baseball, you may already be aware of the ongoing Biogenesis scandal. In short, an ex-employee of a Miami-based steroid clinic leaked hundreds of pages of documents from the clinic to the Miami New Times earlier this year, identifying several big-name MLB players as clients. The Milwaukee Brewers’ Ryan Braun has already been suspended for the rest of this season, and A-Rod’s suspension is imminent. Unfortunately (and unsurprisingly), Biogenesis’s shady operation wasn’t limited to baseball. From a new ESPN report:

The man who turned the Biogenesis clinic from a quiet investigation in Miami into a national scandal says there are at least a dozen more athletes whose names haven’t been exposed and that they come from across the sports world.

Porter Fischer, the former Biogenesis of Miami clinic employee who turned boxes of documents over to the Miami New Times last year, declined to name the athletes. But in his first television interview, Fischer told “Outside the Lines” that numerous sports had at least one athlete who received performance-enhancing drugs from clinic founder Tony Bosch.

“This isn’t a 2013 thing or a 2012 thing; some of these people have been on the books since 2009,” Fischer said.

Fischer said he and associates have identified athletes from the NBA, NCAA, professional boxing, tennis and MMA, in addition to other professional baseball players who have not yet been identified. As far as he knows, Fischer said, Bosch had no clients from the NFL or NHL…

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