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Tag: PEDs

UFC Drug-Fail Alert: Kevin Casey Tests Positive for Steroids, Robert Drysdale Tests Positive for Elevated Testosterone (Again)


(And yet, this is still the most shameful thing that Kevin Casey has ever done.)

Drug testing at the UFC’s back-to-back events in Las Vegas earlier this month caught two more PED-cheaters, who will be facing fines, suspensions, and the overturning of their victories. MMA Junkie broke the news yesterday evening.

We’ll begin with middleweight Kevin Casey, who tested positive for the anabolic steroid drostanolone following his 61-second TKO of Bubba Bush in the curtain-jerking match at UFC 175. The fight represented a second chance in the UFC for “King” Casey, who bounced out of the promotion last year after a stint on TUF 17. Unfortunately, Casey has pissed all over that chance, and might find himself on the chopping block after this one.

Fun fact: Though 2014 has been plagued by positive drug tests for elevated testosterone, HGH, EPO, hCG, and assorted hormone regulators and diuretics, this is the first time all year that a fighter has tested positive for old-school steroids. UPDATE: I was wrong. Bellator welterweight Herman Terrado tested positive for the same steroid in April.

And in “enough testosterone to choke a horse” news…

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Quote of the Day: Tim Kennedy Goes Nuclear on Vitor Belfort’s (Alleged) Drug Use, Says Belfort Won’t Be Able to Compete Clean


(We get it, dude, you’re scary. / Photo via gerbergear.com)

Despite failing a random drug test for elevated testosterone earlier this year, Vitor Belfort is the leading candidate to get the next crack at UFC middleweight champion Chris Weidman‘s belt. What’s more, UFC president Dana White wants to hold the fight in Brazil, where Belfort competed through all of 2013 without incident, unhindered by random drug tests.

And yeah, that’s bullshit. Handing a title fight in a friendly jurisdiction to Belfort — who also tested positive for steroids in 2006 — would not be the best look, from a public relations standpoint, and one fighter is calling foul, as loudly as possible. On the latest episode of Submission Radio, middleweight contender Tim Kennedy argued once again for the increased usage of random drug testing in MMA (particularly blood-testing, which would detect HGH and EPO), and verbally assaulted Belfort in particular:

Right now [Belfort is] down in Brazil, or back in you know California, training his butt off and injecting anything that he wants to and loving it, and nobody’s testing him, or like his doctor — when I say his, I’m making quotation fingers ‘doctor’ — so he’s like dripping testosterone out of his eyeballs right now. How old was he when he first failed a drug test, like 18? For anabolic steroids? So he’s being using for 20 years. Your body doesn’t function naturally now. He’s what, 37 or 38? So like 18 years

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CagePotato Ban: Saying You Don’t Care If Your Opponents Are Using PEDs


(Bagautinov’s doping wasn’t enough to earn him a victory — but that’s no reason to let him off the hook. / Photo via MMAJunkie)

Now that random drug testing is nailing MMA fighters on a regular basis, the truth is inescapable: PEDs have become the sport’s most urgent and embarrassing problem. But not every fighter is an anti-drug crusader like Tim Kennedy and Georges St. Pierre. Before his star-making beatdown of Diego Brandao at UFC Fight Night 46 on Saturday, Conor McGregor told MMAJunkie how he really feels about performance-enhancing drugs:

“I don’t really care about that stupid s–t,” McGregor said. “I’m just doing my thing. I’m just performing and getting better. I don’t care what anyone else does….Take whatever you want, I’m still going to whoop your ass.”

His words were nearly identical to what former UFC lightweight champion Benson Henderson said about steroids last year, and also echoed those of UFC flyweight champion Demetrious Johnson, who expressed similar sentiments on The MMA Hour recently, after it came out that his last opponent Ali Bagutinov was using EPO going into the fight:

“I don’t care if my opponents are cheating or not,” Johnson said. “I train my butt off to fight the man who is put in front of me whether he’s on steroids or not. I want to play on a level playing field, but if they knew about it beforehand and didn’t stop it, at the same time, I took care of business. No big deal.”

Except it is a big deal, and saying otherwise makes MMA look like a joke.

Look, I get it. Claiming that you don’t care if your opponents are doping scores you badass points, and it can endear you to the segment of the MMA fanbase that really doesn’t care about the ongoing scourge of PEDs. (“I like Conor because he doesn’t bitch about drug-testing like these other pussies. Let ‘em take what they want!” — Darryl T. Justbleedguy)

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Ali Bagautinov Tested Positive for EPO Before UFC 174 Title Fight, Catches One Year Suspension


(“Dear God, please let the lab lose my sample.” / Photo via MMAJunkie)

Recent flyweight title challenger Ali Bagautinov has been suspended for one year following a positive test for erythropoietin (EPO), a unapproved hormone that increases red blood cell production. (See also: Lance Armstrong, Chael Sonnen.) The British Columbia Athletic Commission on Thursday confirmed the news today.

Bagautinov failed a random drug test that was administered on June 2nd, 12 days before his unanimous decision loss to Demetrious Johnson at UFC 174 in Vancouver. As BCAC Commissioner Dave Maedel explained (via MMAJunkie):

These results were not available prior to the UFC 174 event due to lab processing times…I have suspended Mr. Bagautinov’s licence to compete in British Columbia for a period of one year.

So not only was UFC 174 the poorest-selling PPV in nine years, it also produced one more victim of MMA’s newest supervillain — the random drug-test. Seriously, increased drug testing is wiping out high-profile fighters left and right lately, which tells you all you need to know about how widespread the doping problem is in this sport. Keep fighting the good fight, athletic commissions.

We’ll update you when Bagautinov releases the inevitable statement blaming his doctor or nutritional supplements.

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Signing Cris Cyborg Would Put a Spotlight on the UFC’s Drug Problem — And That’s a Good Thing


(A vision of a terrifying future? / Photo via FightNext)

By Trent Reinsmith

On July 5 UFC women’s bantamweight champion Ronda Rousey positively destroyed #2 ranked contender Alexis Davis. The fight, UFC 175’s co-main event, was Rousey’s fourth UFC title defense, and lasted just 16 seconds, making it the second shortest title fight in UFC history. The fight was so short that the UFC didn’t even make a highlight video available. If they had, it would have been the entire bout.

Leading into the contest, commentators Joe Rogan and Mike Goldberg tried to sell fans that Davis was going to be a tough test for Rousey. She wasn’t. Davis landed a total of two strikes during the fight, while Rousey landed 16. Most of Rousey’s strikes came after she kneed Davis to the body and threw her to the ground. Once on the mat, Rousey unloaded a series of punches to Davis’ head, and Yves Lavigne mercifully waved off a fight that had to leave some wondering why the matchup was booked in the first place.

At the post-fight media scrum, UFC president Dana White fielded the inevitable question: When will the UFC sign the one female fighter that many feel will give Rousey some true competition, Cris “Cyborg” Justino? Instead of dismissing the question with a tirade about managers, drugs, weight cutting and death — which is White’s usual play — he turned the question around to the media in attendance and asked if they wanted him to sign Justino to the UFC.

White found only one media member that was opposed to the organization signing the current Invicta FC featherweight champion.

After polling the media, White said he didn’t want to hear the media’s “bullshit” if he does sign Justino. “This shit is going to fucking flip as soon as I sign her, about drug testing and all the other bullshit. It will be the biggest fucking topic. It will be the biggest fucking story for you guys to write on whether she’s — oh my fucking God. The script will flip immediately.”

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Brian Stann Becomes the Latest Former Fighter to Rally Against MMA’s “Inadequate” Drug-Testing Policies


(The face of MMA’s anti-PED crusade, ladies and gentlemen.) 

Does it say more about the UFC or its athletes that classy, universally-respected guys like Georges St. Pierre and Brian Stann only feel comfortable discussing their gripes with the organization’s drug-testing policies after they have stepped away from the sport? It’s hard to say for sure, but in any case, Stann has followed suit with GSP, first lamenting the sport’s drug issues as a “major part” of why he retired earlier this month before further explaining himself during an appearance on The MMA Hour yesterday.

While Stann refused to name names, he was quick to admit that MMA’s lackadaisical drug-testing has made it easy for many a fighter to cycle on and off PED’s over the years — a trend that will continue to plague the sport until a change is made:

I think the time when you retire coming off a loss and then you say that, what I didn’t want to do was discredit any of my former opponents. You know, specifically seeing that Wanderlei (Silva) was my last fight, I didn’t want to come off like, ‘Hey, I’m making excuses. The only people that beat me were people on drugs.’ I don’t know any of that for a certainty. There’s one time when I fought a guy on TRT when it was allowed, and that’s the only time that I could say substantially somebody was taking something. But, it was a factor.

I’m a clean fighter. I’m 33 years old, and I have seen, in my own training, and in talking and knowing guys in the inner circle, I’ve known what guys are not on, and when they cycle on it. You can feel the difference in the gym and what big a difference it makes, and I do think there are a number of guys who are using just because the testing currently by our athletic commissions is inadequate.

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MMA’s Catch-22 Drug Trap: Why So Many Fighters Fall Into Addiction


(MMA competition can provide the stability necessary for a person to beat addiction. It can also create the physical and emotional chaos that leads to drugs in the first place.)

By Santino DeFranco

For months I’ve wanted to get started on an article discussing drug use among MMA athletes, but just haven’t gotten my fingers to the keyboard. For some reason, after seeing Dennis Siver’s positive test for HCG recently — probably the least worrisome drug I’ve ever seen someone test positive for — I’ve decided to get going with it.

In addition to the positive tests for performance enhancing substances that we’ve seen dozens of times in this sport, there has been an alarming number of positive drug tests for recreational and prescription drugs as well. We’ve also seen countless fighters wage personal battles with substance abuse outside of the ring/cage, with several ending in death — accidental as well as suicide. It’s the recreational drugs and prescription painkillers that have caught my attention as something that may need to be addressed.

After seeing so many fighters struggle with drug abuse over the years like Joe Riggs, Drew Fickett, Karo Parisyan, along with those that have passed away from drug-related circumstances like Shane Del Rosario and Shelby Walker, I started to wonder: Is MMA leading athletes to become addicted to drugs, or are people who are more prone to drug use entering the world of mixed martial arts?

What I found out is that the answer to both previous questions is yes. Those more prone to use drugs do enter MMA, and MMA in return, leads those to use drugs and subsequently become addicted to them. It’s a hell of a lot more complex than that, but simply put, MMA fighters, as well as boxers, are kind of screwed.

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Jon Jones Isn’t Saying Glover Teixeira Is a Steroid-User…But Why Take Any Chances?


(Jones is so committed to clean competition that he carries a bottle of fresh, hot urine with him at all times. / Photo via Getty)

Earlier this month, Jon Jones revealed to FOX Sports that he requested random drug-testing for himself and Glover Teixeira in advance of their light-heavyweight title fight at UFC 172 (April 26th, Baltimore). At the time, it seemed like Jones was taking up the Anti-PED Superhero mantle from Georges St-Pierre.

“It was something me and my management team asked for several months ago,” Jones said. “We thought it would be great to make sure everyone was playing fair in this fight. I’m not accusing my opponent of anything, but it’d just be great to see. [The Maryland State Athletic Commission] said they would need the UFC to approve it, the UFC approved it and paid for the whole thing and they never told me or Glover when our tests would come…

“I just think it’d be great to know that the athletes that are competing are competing clean,” Jones said. “I’ve never taken any kind of performance-enhancing drug and I don’t think any of my opponents should. I know that I’ve probably fought people in the past that have, and I’ve still come up with a way to win, but I just think it’s important that it goes away.

“I want our sport to be a clean sport. I want athletes to have pride and hard work and that’s why I thought I would put my money where my mouth is and get the test for myself. I have no right to accuse [Teixeira] of being on anything,” Jones said. “I know when people get chances to fight for world titles maybe they’ll do anything to get an edge, and I think the only edge you should have is work ethic so I thought we should both get tested.”

Now, in a follow-up interview with ESPN’s Brett Okamoto, Jones explained what really motivated him to request enhanced testing for this fight, and it has nothing to do with any lofty goals of cleaning up the sport. Basically, Glover Teixeira is 34 years old, he’s strong as an ox, and Jones finds that kind of suspicious:

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Friday Link Dump: Belfort’s Mysterious Random Drug Test, Weidman Opens as 2-1 Favorite Over Machida, Eight Damn-Near-Impossible Video Games + More


(If you’re a Fight Pass subscriber…let us know how this fight turns out, alright? / Props: YouTube.com/UFC)

- Results of Vitor Belfort’s Random Drug Test Will Not Be Released Unless He Does so Himself (MMAFighting)

- Can Anybody Explain This Conor McGregor Billboard on Sunset Strip? (MiddleEasy)

- Zak Cummings Missed Weight So Bad That His ‘UFC Fight Night: Macau’ Match Was Canceled (BloodyElbow)

- Chris Weidman Opens as -210 Favorite Over Lyoto Machida in UFC 173 Title Fight (MMAJunkie)

- Matt Hughes: Georges St. Pierre Doesn’t Want to Come Back to UFC and Take Another Beating From Johny Hendricks (MMAMania)

- More Still Needs to Be Done in Struggle Against PED Use (Yahoo!)

- 2014 Oscar Nominee Childhood Photos (WorldWideInterweb)

- The 50 Greatest NBA Plays of the ’90s (Complex)

- 10 Ways to Cancer-Proof Your Life (MensFitness)

- Dazzle Your Oscar Party With These Printable Bingo Cards (Crushable)

- Eight Scripts That Should Have Never Made It to the Big Screen (EscapistMagazine)

- 20 Things That Happen When You Don’t Wear a Bra, In GIFs (TheGloss)

Eight Utterly Frustrating Video Games That You Could Never Beat (HolyTaco)

- Dana Snay Loses $80,000 with “SUCK IT” Facebook Message (EveryJoe)

- The Complete Cheat-Guide to ‘Thief’ (Gamefront)

- The Funniest Autocorrects of February 2014, Part One! (DamnYouAutocorrect)

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Quote of the Day: Anthony Johnson Has Nothing Against PEDs, As Long as You Don’t Kill Nobody


(Photo via Ryan Loco/Blackzilians)

Light-heavyweight slugger Anthony Johnson has been back in the UFC for less than a week, and already he’s courting controversy. During a recent interview with SiriusXM TapouT Radio, Johnson said he has no problem with performance-enhancing drug use in MMA — and seemed to argue in favor of responsible usage of PEDs. Here’s what he had to say (via MMAMania):

In every sport people are using something. I mean, as long as nobody dies, nobody pulls a Chris Benoit, you know what I’m saying? I think everything is going to be fine. If it’s something that can absolutely help you, I don’t see what the problem is. Until that moment you go crazy on the person — whoever it may be — you can’t absolutely blame the…I don’t know. I guess it’s just an iffy situation.”

If you abuse it, of course you are going to get popped for it and do stupid stuff. But if you use it the right way and you just do what you are supposed to do, then it shouldn’t be a problem…I think if you can do it, do it. I don’t have nothing against it. You know what I’m saying? As long as you don’t kill nobody.”

Of course, Johnson didn’t come out and say that he uses steroids or unapproved hormone therapy, though he indirectly cast suspicion on some of the UFC’s champions:

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