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Tag: PRIDE videos

Hector Lombard vs. Yushin Okami Added to UFC on FUEL 8 in Japan

The UFC confirmed last night that a middleweight matchup between knockout king Hector Lombard and perennial contender Yushin Okami has been added to the PRIDE fanboy circle-jerk that is UFC on FUEL 8: Silva vs. Stann, March 3rd in Saitama, Japan. Both fighters scored victories last month, with Lombard destroying fellow fireplug Rousimar Palhares in the first round of their match at UFC on FX: Sotiropoulos vs. Pearson, and Okami (somewhat less impressively) earning a decision against Alan Belcher at UFC 155.

In keeping with the theme of UFC on FUEL 8′s main card — which will feature such legends as Wanderlei Silva, Takanori Gomi, and Mark Hunt — Lombard and Okami also competed for PRIDE early in their careers. Lombard lost decisions to Akihiro Gono and Gegard Mousasi under the PRIDE Bushido banner in 2006, while Okami submitted Steve White via strikes (at PRIDE The Best Vol.3 in 2002) and outpointed Ryuta Sakurai (at PRIDE Bushido 2 in 2004). Video proof is after the jump.

Though Michael Bisping might argue that he and Vitor Belfort are the only two middleweights worth a damn at the moment, another savage knockout performance from Lombard could place him in the proverbial “mix.” Your predictions for this one, please.

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Classic Fight: Fedor Emelianenko vs. Mirko Cro Cop @ Pride Final Conflict 2005

As Reddit/MMA reminds us, today is the seventh anniversary of Fedor Emelianenko and Mirko “Cro Cop” Filipovic‘s meeting at PRIDE Final Conflict 2005, an instant classic that still ranks among the greatest heavyweight fights in MMA history. Emelianenko had already held the PRIDE heavyweight title for two-and-a-half years by the time he made his belt defense against Cro Cop, and entered the match with a PRIDE record of 10-0 with one no-contest. Meanwhile, Cro Cop had earned his shot at Fedor on the strength of a seven-fight PRIDE win streak that included victories over Alexander Emelianenko, Josh Barnett, Kevin Randleman, and Mark Coleman.

Though both fighters would later complain that they came into the fight less than 100% healthy, Emelianenko and Filipovic put on a thrilling war for the entirety of the three-round, 20-minute fight. Cro Cop started strong, breaking Fedor’s nose with punches and punishing him with kicks to the body, but Fedor regained momentum as Cro Cop’s cardio began to fade, slugging his way to a unanimous decision victory. It was Emelianenko’s toughest fight to that point, and arguably his most entertaining. As for Filipovic, he may have fallen short of the PRIDE heavyweight title that night, but his greatest career triumph was just around the corner.

After the jump: If you have the time to spare, the complete fight is below…

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Video Retrospective: Mauricio ‘Shogun’ Rua’s 16 Most Essential Fights

Over the last ten years, we’ve watched Mauricio “Shogun” Rua go from young phenom to living legend. Though injuries and and controversial judging have occasionally slowed his momentum during the second half of his career, Shogun enters next weekend’s UFC on FOX 4 matchup with Brandon Vera as a standard-bearer for his generation of fighters, and is still considered among the elite of the light-heavyweight division.

In honor of Rua’s continuing legacy, we’ve picked out the 16 videos that best summarize his journey as a fighter — from the past to the present, from his most unforgettable triumphs to his most crushing defeats. Enjoy, and pay your respects in the comments section.


Mauricio Rua vs. Rodrigo Malheiros de Andrade. Shot in 1998 when Rua was just 16 years old, this footage shows the future PRIDE/UFC star competing in a Muay Thai smoker in somebody’s house in Curitiba, Brazil. Though Shogun shows flashes of his trademark aggression, his technique hasn’t quite blossomed yet, and he winds up getting head-kick KO’d at the video’s 7:15 mark.


Mauricio Rua vs. Rafael Freitas, Meca World Vale Tudo 7, 11/8/02. Rua was 20 years old when he made his official MMA debut against Rafael “Capoeira” Freitas, who was tenacious in his attempts to put Shogun on his back. But Freitas couldn’t keep him there, and the standup exchanges were lopsided in Rua’s favor. After a few minutes of abusing his opponent with knees, punches, and stomps, Shogun finally puts Freitas out cold with a head-kick.

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Killer Highlight Reel Alert: The First Eight PRIDE Events, Condensed to 33 Minutes of Awesome


(Props: Hiten Mitsurugi)

CagePotato reader Andrew K. sent this to us with the brief message “The newbs deserve to know.” And indeed, they do. Above is part one of a new highlight series featuring the best moments of PRIDE’s early days, mostly soundtracked by obscure video-game music. (It’s amazing how well that works together.) Give it a look and you will witness…

- Gary Goodridge, back when he was still one of the scariest men to ever enter a cage or ring.

- Rickson Gracie armbarring Nobuhiko Takada on two separate occasions.

- Kazushi Sakuraba vs. Carlos Newton, aka The Greatest Grappling Exhibition in MMA History.

- Mark Kerr, in absolute beast-mode.

- Emmanuel Yarborough, doing whatever it is that he does.

And so much more! Check out parts 2 and 3 after the jump, which cover PRIDE 5-8, including the infamous Takada vs Coleman fight, and Sakuraba taking out his first Gracie. Here’s hoping this highlight series continues, because PRIDE 8 was immediately followed by one of the most epic tournaments in the history of the sport.

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MMA Video Tribute: 9 ‘Falling Tree’ Knockouts


(Igor Vovchanchyn vs. Francisco Bueno @ PRIDE 8, 11/21/99. Josh Barnett makes the tree-analogy at the 0:41 mark.)

Edson Barboza‘s spinning heel-kick knockout of Terry Etim at UFC 142 wasn’t just an instant-classic because of the technique itself — it was also unforgettable because of the devastating effect it had on Etim, who stiffened up and toppled straight to the mat in slow motion like a felled spruce. The “falling tree” knockout is a rare, brutal moment in combat sports that always gets a rise out of fans. Here are nine of our favorite examples from MMA fights, in no particular order.


(Edson Barboza vs. Terry Etim @ UFC 142, 1/14/12)

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Confirmed: Anderson Silva Responds to Losses by Cursing, Crying [VIDEOS]


(Anderson’s naughty language begins at 3:54.)

Props to MiddleEasy for turning us on to the SAMURAIFIGHTSPIRITS channel on YouTube, which specializes in post-fight footage from the PRIDE era. Seriuously, this is already my favorite time-suck of the week. Here’s Chuck Liddell predicting that this Alistair Overeem kid is gonna be good. Here’s Kevin Randleman screaming “I SUCK!” after getting caught in a guillotine by Mirko Cro Cop. Here’s Rulon Gardner chillin’ with Dan Henderson. So much awesome.

Maybe the most fascinating bits of footage are the clips of Anderson Silva reacting to his pair of submission losses to Daiju Takase and Ryo Chonan, which ended the Spider’s PRIDE stint on an unsatisfying note. Above, the Takase loss makes Silva fire off a string of Portugeuse expletives that would make a marinheiro blush. After the jump, an obviously-in-pain Silva can barely keep his emotions together after his freak upset loss to Chonan via flying-scissor-leg-takedown/heel-hook. So remember: Before Anderson was an unbeatable UFC champion, he was a crier, just like you.

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Video Timeline: MMA’s Greatest Techniques of the Year, 1993-2011

Nick Diaz Takanori Gomi PRIDE 33 gogoplata
(Ah, 2007. A very fine year for gogoplatas. / Photo via Sherdog)

By Ben Goldstein

Over the last two decades, MMA has evolved so consistently that fighters are still finding new and unexpected ways to destroy their opponents — while causing fans to spit their beers in shock. We decided to take a lil’ spin through MMA history and identify the single most awe-inspiring technique from each year since the sport’s modern inception. We expect you to disagree with us; there’s a comments section just for that purpose. And away we go…

1993: Royce Gracie’s Rear-Naked Choke
vs. Ken Shamrock @ UFC 1, 11/12/93

(Fight starts at the 3:54 mark)

You have to remember that in the early ’90s, a well-placed roundhouse kick to the head was considered the pinnacle of martial arts. What Royce Gracie introduced to fight fans in his early UFC run was something much more practical, less flashy, and a little bit scary. Gracie’s submission of Ken Shamrock — and the similar hold he used to stop Gerard Gordeau in the finals — proved that skill beat size, and pajamas beat man-panties.

1994: Dan Severn’s Suplexes
vs. Anthony Macias @ UFC 4, 12/16/94

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MMA Hall of Shame: Joe Son’s Leopard-Print Thong


(Props: nymeria83)

Despite his woeful lack of judgement last week at UFC 133, Dennis Hallman can only claim to have the second most embarrassing ring attire in MMA history. The #1 spot still belongs to actor-rapist Joe Son and his ass-exposing leopard-print thong.

Nearly seven years after his sole Octagon appearance at UFC 4, in which he had his nuts destroyed by Keith Hackney, Son re-emerged for a trio of fights in 2002, all of which he lost in the first round via injury or terror. His Japanese MMA debut against Yusuke Imamura at Pride The Best Vol. 1 was especially infamous. Joe came out to the ring wearing a bowler-hat (in honor of his role as “Random Task” in Austin Powers), white eye-shadow, and the aforementioned ass-floss.

You can see clips of the debacle in the above highlight-reel. Skip to the 2:14-2:28 mark to witness the PRIDE rope-crew earn their paychecks in the most humiliating way possible. As with his two subsequent fights, Son tapped before his opponent could inflict any apparent damage. But by that point, he had violated every set of eyeballs in the audience. Joe Son, you are truly MMA’s Worst Person Ever.

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Easter Sunday Video Tribute: ‘Back From the Dead’ Fights

Robbie Lawler Melvin Manhoef Strikeforce MMA photos
(Leg kicks, why have you forsaken me? / Photo courtesy of allelbows.com)

Today, as you know, is Easter — a day in which Christians celebrate the resurrection of Jesus, three days after his crucifixion. To commemorate the holiday, we’d like to take this time to remember notable resurrections in the sport of mixed martial arts. (Because we’re respectful like that.) There’s nothing more incredible than watching a dude get the living crap beaten out of him for minutes at a time, and then somehow, miraculously, finding the strength to knock his opponent dead before the last bell. So without further ado, here are 11 of our favorite “Back From the Dead” MMA fights of all time…

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Top Ten Japanese Freak Show Fights That Were Actually Good

Eric Esch Butterbean Zuluzinho PRIDE MMA freak shows Japan photos videos
(A Japanese whaling boat dumps out the day’s catch…)

By CagePotato contributor Matthew Kaplowitz

As Japanese MMA seems to slowly dwindle away from the glory days of the sport, hardcore fans like myself shed a tear for our great loss. It wasn’t just knowing those obscure 135-pounders whose names had syllables our gaijin tongues could barely pronounce, or the fact that it was the land where stomping and soccer-kicking a human being in the face was perfected into a sweet science. More than that, it was the stars that were produced that we came to know and love, whether they were fighting someone on their level or tearing open a tomato can — and that is where this list begins.

Blatant mismatches aside, JMMA gave us so many beautiful fights with men like Fedor Emelianenko, Mirko “Crocop” Filipovic (go tell your favorite TUF noob that his last name is not Crocop and relish in their confusion), Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira, Ikuhisa Minowa and Kazushi Sakuraba. For every epic bout that went into the history books for their unbelievable drama, we had other fights that we remember for less than pleasant reasons. Yes, the freak show fights! What would a JMMA event be without a match worthy of a 1930′s carnival? The big question here was how do I rank something that is mediocre to begin with? Well, I’m as clueless as you are, so let’s get started on this journey down “Freak Show Lane,” across the street from “What Were They Thinking? Boulevard”…

10. Daiju Takase vs. Emmanuel Yarbrough
Pride 3, 6/24/98

This was the first freak show fight in Pride history, and earns a place on this list for that merit alone. It pit 169 lb. Daiju Takase against 600 lb. Emmanuel Yarbrough, who most fans will recall was clobbered into submission by Keith Hackney and his broken hand at UFC 3 (Yarbrough has no luck in any event associated with the number three). The sumo plodded around the ring tossing his hamhock arms at Takase, while the smaller Japanese fighter fled and slowly wore down Yarbrough.

Takase makes the mistake of going for a lazy single leg on Yarbrough, which results in the large fighter flopping onto his belly and absorbing Takase into his flesh. As Stephen Quadros lamented, “This is horrible! This is like “Jaws!” Eventually, Takase slid out from the greasy underside of Manny, and in an ending eerily similiar to his UFC 3 fight, Takase went to town with clubbing hands to his exhausted opponent’s face, leading to a tapout in the middle of the second round.

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