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Tag: retirement

Georges St. Pierre Announces He’s “Ready to Return,” Calls for Title Fight With Michael Bisping

(Ahhhh the good ol’ days, right Georges?)

It’s been three years since Georges St. Pierre last competed in the octagon, three years the former champ has gloriously spent selling booze, signing boobs and unearthing dinosaur bones. It’s a life that stood in stark contrast to what we come to see from St. Pierre in the latter stages of his career — the self-doubt, the anxiety, the onslaught of strikes he was beginning to absorb in each fight — and one that GSP himself admitted to being more than content with. Georges St. Pierre was one of the all-too rare fighters to recognize that his best days were behind him and that is was best to step away from the sport while he still had his facilities intact.

And now, he’s ready to take it all back.


Conor McGregor Has Retired From MMA, Apparently, And WAIT, WHAT?!!!

(via Getty)

Well, ain’t this some shit.

According to multiple sources, UFC featherweight champion Conor McGregor has suddenly, inexplicably, opted to retire from mixed martial arts. Except that he probably hasn’t. Except that he *has* been pulled from his UFC 200 rematch with Nate Diaz. Honestly, no one really knows what the Hell is going on right now, but head after the jump for all the details.


And Now He’s Retired: Anthony “The Hippo” Perosh Hangs ‘Em Up at 43 Years Old

(via Getty)

I’ve always been a bit of an oddball MMA fan when it comes to picking my “favorite” fighters. While respecting the otherworldly athleticism of a Jon Jones, the otherworldly physique of a Alistair Overeem, or the otherworldly riddum of a Georges St. Pierre, I would never list any of those guys in even my top 10 favorites. What can I say? Being a fan of Jon Jones (the fighter, at least) is just too easy for an anti-establishment renegade like myself — like being a Lakers fan in the early aughts or a Patriots fan ever.

This is all a way of saying that I always found myself drawn to fighters who were more, well, human. I’m talking about the “everymen” of the sport — the guys who started off on the coveted bar fighting circuit or doing a little training on the side before finding out that they had some translatable skills to bring to the game. I’m talking about your old school, cornfed, perpetually 40-year-old-looking dudes who may have never been a champion, but always made sure to 1) show up and 2) turn in a memorable, fan-pleasing performances. I’m talking about your Jeremy Horns, your Chris Lytles, and your Anthony Peroshes.

Which is why I’m both saddened and relieved to learn that, following a pair of tough first round losses to Sean O’Connell and Gian Villante, “The Hippo” will be hanging up his gloves for good.


Mirko Cro Cop Withdraws From UFC Seoul, Retires From MMA Again

(via Getty.) 

It’s been a long, strange journey for Mirko “Cro Cop” Filipovic — one full of ups, downs, and plenty of bumps and bruises along the way. From his incredible one-night performance at the 2006 Pride Open Weight Tournament, to his retirement from the sport in 2011, to his return to the UFC and redemptive victory over Gabriel Gonzaga, Mirko Cro Cop will forever be remembered as one of the sport’s most iconic figures and a trailblazer in the defining age of mixed martial arts.

And today, it looks like that trail has finally come to an end.


And Now He’s Retired: Cung Le Will No Longer Be Throwing Spinning Sh*t

(Warrior. Photo via Victor Fraile/Getty Images)

Well, we probably should have seen this coming.

In the media firestorm following his Fight Night 48 drug-testing fiasco and subsequent (but unrelated) class-action lawsuit against the UFC, Cung Le has decided to retire from MMA. Fans of spinning sh*t, pour one out.

In eight years of professional competition, Le collected a 9-3 record that included wins over Rich Franklin, Patrick Cote, and Frank Shamrock — the latter of which earned him the Strikeforce middleweight championship. After rattling off back-to-back wins at the age of 40 in 2012, Le came under fire when he tested positive for HGH following his 4th round TKO loss to Michael Bisping at Fight Night Macau in August. While photos of Le’s suspiciously jacked physique had raised a heap of questions prior to the fight, it was the UFC’s mishandling of his urine sample that raised a ton more.

Seeking to clear his name, Le immediately (and rightfully) challenged the results of his test, which in turn led to his 12-month suspension being lifted due to “lack of evidence.” When the UFC failed to sincerely apologize for dragging his name through the mud, Le asked to be released of his contract before being named as one of the chief plaintiffs in the class-action lawsuit filed against the promotion. Despite this, Le was still listed as a member of the UFC’s active roster until his retirement was announced yesterday.

After the jump: Check out Le’s prepared statement, the UFC’s response, and a brief tribute to some of his most memorable moments in the cage.


And Now He’s Retired/Angry: Cody McKenzie Blasts the UFC and Everything It Stands For in Farewell Interview

(Fightin’ Guy Fawkes McKenzie was the best McKenzie. / Photo via Getty)

We’re not going to burn another paragraph listing the ways that Cody McKenzie‘s career has gone poorly in the last year. In fact, McKenzie is exactly the kind of guy who Count Bisping was talking about when he dismissed the UFC class-action lawsuit as sour grapes from promotional washouts.

But consider this: The sheer fact that McKenzie made it to the UFC and then earned three victories inside the Octagon means that his MMA career was far more successful than the vast majority of fighters who try their hands at this sport. It’s weird to put it in those terms, but Cody McKenzie was an elite fighter, relatively speaking.

McKenzie officially announced his retirement from MMA yesterday with the following tweet…

Then, he sat down for a long, must-read interview with BleacherReport’s Hunter Homistek, in which he described what a miserable, impoverished existence it was to compete in the UFC as a non-star. His words echo those of numerous “low-level” fighters who often lost money trying to compete in the UFC and were treated like average regional-card shmucks forced to scramble for food and lodging. We’ve compiled all the best bits below…


[VIDEO] Jamie Varner Calls For a Fighters Union Following UFC on FOX 13 Defeat

(Photo via Getty.)

True to his word, Jamie Varner was more than holding his own against Drew Dober at UFC on FOX 13 last weekend until bad luck befell him. While attempting to slam Dober to the mat, Varner pulled a Maynard and unintentionally knocked himself out, only waking up to find himself in a fight-ending rear-naked choke.

It was a particularly tough loss for Varner, being his fourth in as many contests and coming in front of his hometown crowd, and one that signaled that perhaps the game had passed by the former WEC champ. So for the second time, Varner called it quits in his post-fight interview, stating that it was a decision he had been planning to make for some time.

In an interview with media members after the fight, Varner expanded upon his reasons for retiring, what the future holds for him, and perhaps most importantly, the idea of starting a fighter’s union. Join us after the jump for the full interview.


And Now He’s Retired: Yves Edwards Calls It Quits After 17 Years of Thug-Jitsu

Lightweight veteran Yves Edwards announced his retirement last night, after a career that spanned 17 years, 66 fights, and 21 appearances in the UFC. Edwards also competed for PRIDE, Strikeforce, Bellator, King of the Cage, MFC, Shooto — pretty much every promotion that mattered in the last two decades. Here’s what the “ThugJitsu Master” had to say on Facebook yesterday:

I’ve thought about how to say this for a week now, but there’s no better way than to just do it. So here goes; 1st I’d like to say thank you to all the people that I’ve met through and because of fighting, friends, training partners, coaches, fight fans, doctors and even some promoters/matchmakers. A lot of you guys have always shown me nothing but love and I really appreciate that.

Fighting has been a part of my life ever since I was 17 and that makes this a hard pill to swallow but it’s time for me to end this chapter and move on to the next part of my life. So thank you again to all the people that have supported me through this, whether it was through cheers, training, coaching or anything else at all.


Edwards had his share of career highlights over the years — who could forget his jumping head kick knockout of Josh Thomson, or his hopping-knee KO of Edson Berto, or his destruction of Jeremy Stephens? — but his performances fell off the rails in recent years, and he went winless in his last five fights in the UFC. His last three matches resulted in a first-round knockout loss to Yancy Medeiros (which was later overturned due to Medeiros testing positive for marijuana), a third-round rear-naked choke loss to Piotr Hallmann, and a first-round armbar loss to Akbarh Arreola at UFC Fight Night 57. If you’re a well-known veteran who starts dropping fights to guys without Wiki pages is a pretty clear sign that your time in the sport is up.

The 38-year-old retires with a professional MMA record of 42-22-1 with one no-contest. Honor his work by watching some classic Yves Edwards videos after the jump…


Quote of the Day: Bobby Green Thinks This Weekend “Might Be My Last Fight” [NOOOOOOO]

(Photo via Getty.)

It would be hard to name a fighter who has had a more difficult path to the UFC than Bobby Green. A foster kid who traveled between some 50 homes until the age of 20 in California’s notoriously rough Inland Empire, Green has beared witness to the absolute worst that humanity can offer. Even worse is the fact tha despite all his efforts and his recent success in the UFC, he still can’t seem to escape his troubled past.

Last May, Green lost his younger brother, Mitchell Davis Jr. (23), in a gang-related shooting. In the aftermath, a hit was allegedly put out on Green himself. Then in September, Green’s older brother was shot in a non gang-related incident. Thankfully, he survived. That Green was able to not only fight 4 times over the span of these tragedies, but win all 4 contests, speaks a lot to his character, as well as how far he could really go in this sport.

But it’s hard to account for the mental toll the past year in particular has taken on Green, and unfortunately, it looks like we could possibly be seeing the end of “King” in the octagon come this weekend. In a Facebook post last night, Green lamented that he was “tired” and considering retirement following his Fight Night 57 co-main event scrap with Edson Barboza this weekend.

“Think this might be my last fight thinking about retirement,” Green wrote.


And Now He’s “Semi-Retired”: Martin Kampmann’s Indecisive Retirement Speech

Remember Martin Kampmann, Potato Chips (that’s what we call our fans now).

Seeing as he hasn’t fought in over a year, we kind of almost forgot he existed.

If you’re struggling to remember, Kampmann hasn’t fought since a 2013 TKO loss to Carlos Condit. Before that, he was knocked out by Johny Hendricks at UFC 154 in 2012.

Despite the inactivity and two-fight losing streak, Kampmann isn’t done (yet). He told MMA Fighting the following…