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Tag: Tito Ortiz

Friday Link Dump: Tito Ortiz Talks Recovery, Josh Barnett Undergoes WADA, The Bloodiest Fights in MMA History + More


(If this video could somehow serve as our logo moving forward, that would be just great. #sweetmemories Via Reddit MMA.)

2009: The UFC Comes Full Circle, Thanks to One Daring Adventurer (MMAFighting)

The Top 20 Bloodiest Fights in UFC History (Gee, wonder where they got that idea. BloodyElbow)

Tito Ortiz Expects Full Recovery, Return to Gym in 6 Weeks (Bleacher Report)

Josh Barnett to undergo UFC-sponsored random WADA testing ahead of UFC 168 (MMAJunkie)

Frank Mir as the Mad Hatter. Creepy. As. Fuck. (CagePotatoMMA.tumblr.com)

The New Journey for Enson Inoue (Part One) (CagedInsider)

The Jamie Foxx Workout (MensFitness)

5 Laws from Around the World That Make No Sense (DoubleViking)

The Best Sports GIFS of October 2013 (Complex)

6 Things I Learned While Watching Guy Fieri Testify at an Attempted Murder Trial (FilmDrunk)

The Ultimate Scare Prank Freak Outs (WorldWideInterweb)

How Did This Get Made? Ep. 74: Halloween III (Earwolf)

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The Unsupportable Opinion: Death Was the Best Outcome for Bellator’s Inaugural PPV


(MMA gets another PPV that never was)

When your dog is terminally ill, you put it down.

When the sales for your inaugural PPV are anemic, you should do the same.

Officially, Bellator canceled the PPV because Tito Ortiz withdrew from the main event bout versus Rampage Jackson, and not because of the PPV’s dubious chances of success. But the result is the same as if they had just canceled it outright: Bellator saves face.

Ortiz’s injury and the resulting cancellation of the PPV were a godsend for Bellator. Why? Let’s look at the most likely scenario for what could’ve happened if Bellator went on with their PPV — both if Ortiz had gotten injured and if he hadn’t.

Scenario 1, Ortiz doesn’t get injured and the PPV goes on:

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BREAKING: Tito Ortiz Off Bellator PPV Card With Neck Injury, No Longer “The Healthiest He’s Ever Been” [UPDATED]


(The reason was to avoid another unnecessary ass-kicking, Tito. DUH. Via Ortiz’s instagram.)

Hey, you guys? Oh my God, you guys. You guys are never going to believe this shit. It appears that Tito Ortiz’s neck has once again collapsed under the weight of his massive head (via MMAFighting):

Bellator’s inaugural pay-per-view has been hit by the injury bug.

Tito Ortiz suffered a neck injury in training which will keep him out of next weekend’s fight against Quinton Jackson, according to sources with knowledge of the situation.

Bellator is currently seeking a replacement for Ortiz, and it is unclear at this time whether Jackson will remain on the Nov. 2 card. There is a chance next weekend’s pay-per-view card turns into a Spike show with Jackson being moved to another event.

Well, at least Tito didn’t wait until 3 days after the fight to announce that he had been injured the whole time. It’s what we like to call “progress.” But seriously, bathroom selfie or it didn’t happen.

[UPDATE] Bellator sheds some light on the status of their PPV (via Twitter) after the jump…

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CagePotato Open Discussion: Is Anybody About to Spend $34.95+ on the Bellator PPV?


(That face you make when you realize that you’re an overpaid dinosaur who has long since worn out his welcome. And whatever facial expression Hulk Hogan is making.)

The title pretty much says everything I need to. Bellator is only charging the low, low price of far more than any reasonable person would pay to watch Tito Ortiz fight Rampage Jackson in 2013 for their charmingly misguided PPV experiment. That’s right, $34.95 for standard definition – $44.95 [!?] for HD – to watch a “mixed martial arts tournament* where fighters become warriors**.”

*Except, you know, it isn’t a tournament at all.

** How lovely.

Considering that people already aren’t buying tickets to this show, I have to ask: Are any of our readers about to drop over thirty bucks on this card? Because as much as I hate to admit it, I’m not about to spend that much money on this. Maybe if it was stacked with the fighters who have made Bellator so much fun to watch over the past few years — guys like Alexander Shlemenko, Rich Hale, David Rickels and The Pitbull Brothers — I’d be able to justify dropping thirty bucks on it.

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[VIDEO] Adam Carolla Gives Tito Ortiz a Boxing Lesson on The Adam Carolla Show

About three years before the Matt Hamill biopic of the same name came out, comedian Adam Carolla starred in a great little low budget, boxing-centric comedy called The Hammer. The film not only received positive reviews during its limited theatrical run, but more or less showcased a lot of the skills Carolla developed in his past life as boxing trainer (which is actually how he met Jimmy Kimmel and yadda yadda the rest is history…).

Nowadays, Carolla hosts the incredibly popular talk show/podcast, The Adam Carolla Show, and frequently brings on guests from the combat sports world. Rather than have these fighters demonstrate submission holds on him for a cheap laugh (not that there’s anything wrong with that), Carolla prefers to school them in the art of “the sweet science.” Having previously taught Urijah Faber a thing or two about proper striking technique, Carolla recently invited Tito Ortiz onto his program to hit some mits/plug his upcoming Bellator PPV fight with Quinton Jackson.

As much as I know you readers want me to use this opportunity to throw a lowball insult at Ortiz (it is, after all, what CP has been doing since day 1), I just can’t do it today. Sure, Ortiz seemed to be breathing a little heavy for a guy who is less than a month out from a fight, but Ortiz also seemed pretty willing to listen to Carolla’s advice, and given the former’s credentials compared to the latter’s, I respect him for it. Who knows? Maybe I’m entering a new, less cynical chapter of my life. Maybe…

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On This Day in MMA History: CagePotato.com Launches, Immediately Begins Insulting People

On October 21st, 2007 — six years ago today — a snot-nosed MMA blog called CagePotato.com took its first breath, and for the most part, nobody gave a damn. The entire writing staff for the site’s launch consisted of one person, a young magazine-industry refugee named Ben Goldstein (that’s me). My professional credentials consisted of the following: I was a casual fan of the UFC, I had been laid off from a lad-mag called Stuff a couple months earlier, and I needed a job. Any job, really. So, when a friend of a friend named Jonathan Small* called me one day and said he was looking for some warm bodies to launch a few dude-oriented websites for Break Media (now Defy Media), I jumped at the chance. After all, the rent was due.

Though many long-time fans of CagePotato know the site’s history in its broad strokes, few know the details behind its launch. I was hesitant to talk about my personal background in the early days of the site’s existence, because I didn’t want to be exposed as a MMA noob, which I totally was**. Before CagePotato launched in 2007, I hadn’t written a single thing about MMA, and I had never managed a website. I had interviewed actresses and reviewed books, done features about hurricanes and porn stars, but the world of MMA blogging was completely foreign to me. Still, I enjoyed the sport, recognized that it was growing in popularity, and figured I had learned enough about short-form entertainment writing from five years of magazine gigs to make a snarky blog about MMA a modest success. Incredibly, I was right.

The first post I ever published was this Aftermath-type recap of UFC 77, the event where Anderson Silva TKO’d Rich Franklin for the second time, and Tim Sylvia picked up his final win in the UFC. At that point, most of what I knew about MMA came from Wikipedia, but the basic ball-busting tone of CagePotato was present from the beginning. An excerpt:

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TNA Deathwatch: Viacom’s Pro-Wrestling Brand Might Be F*cked Too, You Guys


(See, Viacom? There ARE some things that are too stupid for pro-wrestling fans to watch.)

Remember when we told you guys on Sunday that Bellator is going through some hard times before its (extremely misguided) inaugural PPV? Well, with a brand new episode of TNA Impact scheduled to air tonight, we decided to look into how Viacom’s other promotion is doing. Try not to act too surprised, but here’s the short version of the story:

Believe it or not, the professional wrestling outfit that’s been repackaged as an infomercial for an MMA PPV that no one cares about is in some pretty dire straights. Over the course of the past year, TNA Impact has been making some drastic budget cuts, which have included firing numerous young prospects and veteran wrestlers alike (leading to some hilarious satirical stories from Kayfabe News). Okay, no problem with trimming the fat, right? Well, once main players in the company start getting cut, it’s not exactly a good sign. Follow us after the jump, and we’ll explain…

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‘Rampage vs. Tito’ Ticket Sales Confirm That Bellator Is Pretty Much F*cked, You Guys


(“Move it, asshole, you’re blocking the box!”)

By Matt Saccaro

The ticket sales for Bellator’s November 2nd pay-per-view debut are bad — basically as bad as they could possibly be less than a month out from the card.

On Friday, MMAJunkie’s John Morgan tweeted that the PPV had sold only approximately 1,700 tickets, with another 2,000 on consignment. Matt Roth of MMAMania noted just how dire the situation really is. He pointed out that the venue can hold over 13,000 people, meaning that Bellator would have to sell in the neighborhood of 10,000 tickets in less than 20 days to secure a sellout. That probably isn’t going to happen — not even if Tito Ortiz and Rampage Jackson became giants like in the awful trailer for the PPV.

Bjorn Rebney better be prepared to get a job at his dad’s Winnebago dealership; winter is coming for Bellator. Nobody is going to attend their PPV, and it’s probable that, at an expected price between $35-45, nobody is going to purchase their PPV either. Nobody gives a fuck about their product and their titles are considered worthless. If the UFC stacked three title fights on a card, you’d expect success, even if it were the titles for the three lightest weight classes. But with Bellator, which is offering three title fights on its PPV (although one is a dubious interim title), nobody knows or cares. Hell, we’re a site whose fanbase is comprised pretty much of entirely hardcore fans, and judging by the front page poll, a third of you never even watch Bellator. If they can’t get the hardcores, what fucking chance do they have at getting the casual fans to drop money on this PPV?

Even more concerning is a recent report from MMAPayout about Bellator 102, which UFC “star” Cheick Kongo headlined. The show’s gate was only $73,410.43. A paltry 1,482 people attended the show but nearly half of those tickets (604 of them to be precise) were comped. Now, are you ready to be really amazed? Let’s look at the salaries

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The 10 Greatest Light Heavyweight Title Fights In UFC History


(Photo via Getty)

By Adam Martin

That might be the greatest title fight in the history of the light heavyweight division — and I don’t even know who won! What an incredible fight!

Those are the words UFC color-commentator Joe Rogan uttered last weekend at the end of the five-round epic at UFC 165 between UFC light heavyweight champion Jon Jones and challenger Alexander Gustafsson, a fight Jones won via razor-thin unanimous decision.

Although Rogan is often known for his hyperbole, he might have been dead-on that night. Was “Bones” vs. “The Mauler” really the greatest 205-pound title fight in the history of the Ultimate Fighting Championship? To determine the veracity of that statement, I went back and watched the best light heavyweight fights ever held inside the Octagon, and after countless hours of tape study, I feel as though I’ve come up with a very fair list.

Below I’ve listed what in my opinion are the top 10 light heavyweight fights in UFC history based on a mixed criteria of competitiveness, excitement level, hype, how the fight played out in comparison to its expectations, and how it ended. So without any further ado, let’s get started…

10. Lyoto Machida vs. Mauricio “Shogun” Rua 1, UFC 104

(Photo via Getty)

Kicking off the list is the controversial first fight between Lyoto Machida and Mauricio “Shogun” Rua, a fight that still ranks up there with the worst-all time judging decisions in MMA history.

Machida had just knocked out Rashad Evans at UFC 98 and, in the fateful words of Joe Rogan, the “Machida Era” had commenced. However, “Shogun” had a thing or two to say about that as the former PRIDE star was coming off of two TKO wins over Hall of Famers Chuck Liddell and Mark Coleman, and he wanted to prove to everyone it was he, not Machida, who was the best light heavyweight in the world at the time.

For five rounds, Machida and “Shogun” went toe-to-toe in the Octagon and although Machida definitely had his moments in the match, it appeared to most observers that there would be a new light heavyweight champion crowned, as Rua landed a ton of brutal leg kicks to Machida that left the champ’s torso and thighs looking like a bruised peach.

But while “Shogun” arguably won every round of the fight, the judges somehow saw the fight in favor of Machida, with all three scoring the bout 48-47 in favor of “The Dragon” despite the volume of leg kicks thrown by Rua, leading judge Cecil People to idiotically declare that leg kicks don’t finish fights. UFC president Dana White saw things differently, however, and set up an immediate rematch at UFC 113 where Rua KO’d Machida into oblivion — a happy ending to an infamous screwjob.

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On This Day in MMA History: Randy Couture Puts a Literal Spanking On Tito Ortiz, Unifies the LHW Belts and Becomes the Oldest MMA Champion in Ever

It ended up in the last thirty seconds, in a weird situation. He was kinda outta desperation, he rolled to a kneebar and an ankle lock. He had my leg, I’m sitting and have his feet and all I can see is his butt. You know, he was “The Huntington Beach Bad Boy” and I can’t really get my leg out, and it just pops into my head, ‘spank him.’

That’s how former two-division UFC champion and UFC Hall of Famer Randy Couture described delivering one of the most humiliating beatdowns in MMA History, ten years ago today. The event was UFC 44: Undisputed. Couture’s opponent was then light-heavyweight champion Tito Ortiz, who had successfully defended his title a record five times; a record that would not be broken until last weekend. The date was September 26, 2003 (do you feel old now?).

Believe it or not, there was a time long, long ago when the relationship between the Coutures and the UFC was something other than mutual disdain. It was the early aughts, and after pounding out Chuck Liddell for the interim LHW championship at the previous event, Couture would successfully unify the belts with a five-round drubbing of Ortiz.

While there was no shaming “The Hunting People’s Champ” for losing to a legend like Couture, there was plenty of shame to be seen in the final thirty seconds of the fight, when “The Natural” proceeded to spank his younger foe like he had just found a bag of grass in his sock drawer. For lack of a better word, it was…hilarious.

At 40 years of age, Couture would become the oldest fighter to ever win a UFC title. And he wasn’t even done yet.

But Couture vs. Ortiz wasn’t the only historic beatdown to happen at UFC 44. Not by a long shot…

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