sexy cosplay girls comic con
51 Sexiest Cosplay Outfits From Comic-Con EVER

Tag: UFC videos

Watch the ‘UFC Fight Night: Machida vs. Munoz’ Weigh-Ins Right Here at 11 a.m. ET / 8 a.m. PT [UPDATED w/RESULTS]


(Props: YouTube.com/UFC)

The 24 fighters competing at tomorrow’s UFC Fight Night 30 event in Manchester, England, will be hitting the scales today at 11 a.m. ET. Check out the action live in the video player above; we’ll be updating the results after the jump when it’s all over. In the meantime, look at this photo of a middleweight Machida and ask yourself: Is the Dragon about to tear shit up at 185?

Read More DIGG THIS

Velasquez vs. Dos Santos Mid-Week Update: Medical Suspensions, The Near-Stoppage That Wasn’t, And the Facial Deterioration GIF You’ve Been Waiting For [UPDATED]


(Take another look at the moment in round 3 when Herb Dean “almost stopped the fight.” It turns out he was just trying to yank Cain’s right hand off the fence. Good work, Herb. The fans paid for a five-round beating, and they deserve to get their money’s worth. / Props: Reddit_MMA)

The heavyweight war between Cain Velasquez and Junior Dos Santos at UFC 166 already feels like ancient history, but there are a bunch of related news items popping up this week that you should still be aware of. So let’s dump ‘em, shall we?

- UFC 166 medical suspensions are out, and JDS is suspended indefinitely pending clearance from an ear, nose and throat doctor. (Shawn Jordan and Tim Boetsch were also given indefinite suspensions due to the damage they took in their fights.) Velasquez is medically suspended through April 18th due to a possibly broken jaw, though he could return earlier pending clearance from a doctor. UPDATE: Cain’s team says his jaw is totally fine, and they have no idea why “possibly broken jaw” was listed on his medical suspension. It’s a mystery. The Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation has yet to issue a comment. UPDATE #2: According to a representative for the TDLR, ”After review of the UFC 166 information it has been determined the Velasquez/dos Santos suspensions were posted incorrectly.” Velasquez’s jaw is not broken, and his actual medical suspension is just 15 days.

- When Dos Santos was taken to the hospital after the event, the Brazilian striker admitted that he did not remember much of the fight, and was under the impression that he had been KO’d in the second round. Dos Santos also did not remember doing a post-fight interview with Joe Rogan after the match, which partially excuses how snippy he got with Joe in the beginning. (“He’s a true champion so I’m not?”)

Read More DIGG THIS

5 Things We Learned About Alexander Gustafsson From His ‘On the Brink’ UFC 165 Documentary [VIDEO]


(Props: YouTube.com/FOXSports. Part 2 is after the jump.)

In the wake of Alexander Gustafsson‘s epic title fight against Jon Jones at UFC 165, FOX Sports 1 has released a behind-the-scenes mini-documentary that follows Gustafsson through some intimate moments leading up to and following the bout. We also learned a few new things about the Swedish star. For example…

1. That ‘no-fuss’ look hair style of Gustafsson’s does indeed require some fuss

We won’t admit to being exactly jealous of Gustafsson’s no-effort-needed, scruff-buff style but..ok, we were getting a little jealous. It’s hard enough being an MMA fan while watching a Georges St. Pierre fight while all the female fans within view are fawning over him. Recently, it seemed that Gustafsson was starting to get the same treatment. I mean, what does a brother have to do to simply watch a fight without being reminded of how inadequate he is?

Anyway, early in the ‘On the Brink’ doc, we see Gustafsson painstakingly mold his hair in front of a large mirror and then ask his room mate if it looked alright. Wait, was this whole first point a little weird? I’m starting to think it made me look weird…Next point!

2. Alexander Gustafsson believes that Jon Jones is “insecure”

Gustafsson wasn’t much for trash talk leading up to the Jones fight but in this segment he seemed agitated by Jones’ attitude. Jones’s perceived arrogance is the result of fundamental insecurity, according to Alexander. “He is insecure,” Gus says. “He likes looking down on people. Some people don’t see that but I see that.”

3. Gustafsson doesn’t cut a ton of weight, apparently

As Gustafsson gets into a cab on the Thursday before UFC 165, he tells the driver that he has just nine pounds left to go. “I’m 214,” he says. Now, nine pounds of weight lost in one day would be a lot to you and me, but the light heavyweight division has been home to some of the most monstrous cuts in UFC history from guys like Forrest Griffin and Quinton Jackson who have reportedly showed up to fight weeks well over twenty pounds above the 205 pound limit.

4. After the final horn, Gustafsson didn’t believe that he would was going to win the decision

Read More DIGG THIS

Highlight Reel of the Day: The Top 10 Submissions in UFC History [VIDEO]


(Props: BeautyofMMA. Check it out before the UFC inevitably shuts down their YouTube channel.)

Any top 10 ranking of anything in MMA is bound to be frustratingly subjective. And so it goes with Beauty of MMA‘s well-edited (but sort of oddly-curated) video list of the Top 10 submissions in UFC history.

For me, Anderson Silva’s triangle choke of Chael Sonnen, Frank Mir’s kneebar of Brock Lesnar, Jon Jones’s guillotine choke of Lyoto Machida, Mir’s bone-snapping armbar of Tim Sylvia, and BJ Penn’s gory rear-naked-choke of Joe Stevenson would all be first-ballot selections. They’re all missing here…and yet Dustin Hazelett earns two spots on this countdown. (Luckily, Frank Mir is given his due in the #1 spot. If you’re impatient, all ten fights are listed in the ‘About’ section of the video’s YouTube page.)

What I’m saying is, don’t look at this video list as a definitive take on UFC history — they’re just ten entertaining submissions that will help you pass the time at work on a dull Monday morning. After the jump: Beauty of MMA’s take on the UFC’s top 10 knockouts. At least Anderson is on this one…

Read More DIGG THIS

[VIDEO] 5 Things We Learned From ‘UFC Primetime: Velasquez vs. Dos Santos III’ Episode 1


(Video via the UFC’s Youtube page)

In advance of their UFC 166 world heavyweight title main event on October 19th, champion Cain Velasquez and challenger Junior Dos Santos are being featured in another UFC Primetime documentary series. Episode 1 premiered Wednesday night and already began to reveal a number of interesting tidbits about the fighters and their training camps heading into the rubber match of their trilogy.

1. Junior Dos Santos may be challenging Georges St. Pierre for having the most scientific training camp in the world.

Dos Santos demonstrated incredible will and conditioning throughout the five-round beating he took from Velasquez in their second fight so it was amazing to hear that he wasn’t at his best for the fight, physically. In fact, the then-champion had over-trained for the fight, resulting in a nasty condition called rhabdomyolysis, where muscle fibers were breaking off and let loose into his blood stream.

To make sure that doesn’t happen again to him this training camp, we learned in last night’s episode that Dos Santos has employed a group of scientists who constantly test his blood. He gets his blood drawn at home, he gets it drawn at the gym right before sparring and the white coats spend the rest of the day testing and analyzing his samples and preparing reports for Junior and his team. Dos Santos’ sophisticated strength and conditioning program is informed by that blood work.

By the looks of it, this is some of the most scientific preparation we’ve seen outside of Georges St. Pierre doing gymnastics and benefiting from the French-Canadian supplement-wrestling complex.

2. Daniel Cormier doesn’t plan on showering after he fights Roy Nelson.

Read More DIGG THIS

Classic UFC Fight: Cain Velasquez Beats Bejesus Out of Brock Lesnar, Wins Heavyweight Title


(Fight starts at the 3:03 mark. Props: YouTube.com/UFC)

With UFC heavyweight champion Cain Velasquez set to make his Octagon return next month at UFC 166, the UFC has released the video of his first-ever title fight, which took place at UFC 121 on October 23rd, 2010. His opponent that night was Brock Lesnar, the reigning champ who had proven his toughness the previous July with a classic comeback win against Shane Carwin. Lesnar was gigantic, athletic, and had legit talent as a wrestler. To stand a chance at winning, Velasquez would need to be faster, more efficient with his striking, and more willing to take abuse before giving it back. And that’s exactly what happened.

After some rather hoarse-voiced introductions from The Buff, Lesnar bull-rushes the smaller challenger right away, hoping to establish himself as alpha-male. And it actually works, at first. Brock stuffs some knees into Velasquez’s midsection (including a flying knee), and Cain has to retreat momentarily. He storms back with some punches but Lesnar responds by nailing a takedown and landing on top — a position that had spelled doom for the majority of his past opponents. But Cain gets to his feet immediately.

Brock struggles to put Velasquez’s back on the mat once again, and momentarily succeeds, but Velasquez is up even quicker the second time, and deftly escapes Lesnar’s grasp. It’s here that the momentum shifts. Velasquez begins popping Lesnar with punches, showing off his significant advantage in striking technique, before single-legging Lesnar to the mat and firing down some punches from above as Lesnar is turtled. Eventually he escapes to his feet, but he looks much worse for the wear, hunched over, dazed, swatting at Velasquez in panic.

Read More DIGG THIS

Diego Sanchez Has Been Going Through Some Times, Brother [VIDEO]


(“If I could tell that young Diego Sanchez anything…anything…it wouldn’t matter because he wouldn’t have listened anyway.” Props: YouTube.com/UFC)

Thanks to his 2009 beating at the hands of BJ Penn and a shaky 2-2 stint at welterweight, UFC fan-favorite Diego Sanchez has lost a great deal of the “perennial contender” aura that he’d held during his early ascension. So is The Nightmare Dream still relevant in the year 2013? The jury is still out on that question: Sanchez made his return to lightweight earlier this year in Japan, missed weight by three pounds, then barely snuck off with a split-decision win against Takanori Gomi.

Still, Sanchez has a massive opportunity to redeem himself next month at UFC 166 when he faces former Strikeforce champ/UFC lightweight title contender Gilbert Melendez. In this new profile video, Sanchez explains how some poor personal decisions left his MMA skills fading and his bank account drained, leading to some rough times in his career. Now, he’s reunited with Greg Jackson, focused and humble, and has a wife and son to fight for. It’s the set-up to a Cinderella story. Can he scrap his way to a happy ending?

Related:
- Mark Coleman Has Been Going Through Some Times, Brother
- Ian McCall Has Been Going Through Some Rough Times, You Guys [VIDEO]

Read More DIGG THIS

Phil Davis Was Not Too Happy About the Jones/Gustafsson Decision [VIDEO]


(Props: Christian Wong via Reddit/MMA)

So much of Alexander Gustafsson‘s recent success can be attributed to his decision to move his training home-base to Alliance MMA in Chula Vista, California, and work alongside Phil Davis, the man responsible for the Mauler’s first UFC loss, back in April 2010. Davis’s influence could clearly be seen on Saturday night in Gustafsson’s markedly-improved wrestling game, as he became the first person to successfully take Jon Jones down in the UFC, and stuffed several of Bones’s own takedown attempts.

In short, Davis and Gustafsson are bros, and Mr. Wonderful took it very personally when Gustafsson came out on the wrong end of the scorecards after the five-round dogfight in UFC 165‘s main event. Davis wasn’t just disappointed by the result — he seemed genuinely shocked that the judges saw the fight for Jones. Of course, Davis isn’t exactly an unbiased observer. But he wasn’t the only one to cry “robbery” after watching the fight.

So what did you think? We have a new poll on our homepage sidebar, over there on the right: Was Alexander Gustafsson robbed at UFC 165? Submit your opinion and we’ll see how the MMA fanosphere really feels about this one. For the record, FightMetric scored it 49-48 for Jones based on striking and grappling performance totals, giving the first round to Gustafsson, scoring rounds two and three dead-even, and giving the championship rounds to Jones. Makes sense to me. That being said, if you’re an MMA judge and you submit two 10-10 rounds for the same fight, you would be put on administrative leave faster than C.J. Ross. That’s just the stupid, counter-productive way things work in the fight game. And that’s why we sometimes get scorecards that don’t reflect the reality of the fight.

Read More DIGG THIS

[VIDEO] ‘Ronda Rousey: Breaking Ground’ Profiles the Rise of the UFC’s First Female Star

We came across video of a Fox Sports 1 documentary special on UFC bantamweight champion Ronda Rousey this morning that you should definitely carve out some time to watch, if you’re into that sort of thing. “Breaking Ground” combines interviews with Rousey, her family, friends, coaches, and teammates with previously unreleased training footage to reveal a bit more about the young champ than we knew before.

The special details Ronda’s youth, from her early speech-developmental challenges, the sports she competed in before Judo, and her father’s tragic death, to her relocation to Los Angeles and transition into Judo under the tutelage of her world-champion mother. We also get to see that “Baby Ronda” was the same rowdy and “evil” competitor that we know and love now.

As can be expected, there are great, scary quotes aplenty from Ronda as well as her judo-champ mother, Ana Maria Rousey DeMars. Some of our favorites:

If my mom saw me goofing around or having fun or whatever, she would grab me and she would pull me and sit me in the corner and be like, ‘shut up, sit down and think about winning.’” — Ronda Rousey

When I was a little kid, when I thought of what I wanted to be when I grew up, I didn’t really think, ‘oh I want to be an accountant,’ or, ‘I want to be a dentist.’ I wanted something extraordinary, something that didn’t exist. I wanted to be a super hero.” — Ronda Rousey

I’d go up to people at tournaments and go up behind them and just like kick them in the back of the legs and say, ‘bitch, I’m going to break your fucking arm today.’” — Mama Rousey

Watch the video. Then, watch Ronda and Meisha Tate on the premiere of The Ultimate Fighter: Now We Have Chicks tonight at 10 p.m. ET on Fox Sports 1.

-Elias Cepeda

Read More DIGG THIS

Classic Fight: Frank Mir vs. Brock Lesnar at UFC 81 [VIDEO]


(Match starts at the 10:48 mark. Props: YouTube.com/UFC)

To hype up Frank Mir‘s return to the Octagon at UFC 164 this coming Saturday, the UFC has released one of Frank’s career highlights — his first-round submission victory against pro-wrestling star Brock Lesnar at UFC 81, back in February 2008. Lesnar had first dipped his toes into the MMA pool the previous June, when he swallowed up Min Soo Kim at Dynamite!! USA in Los Angeles. That was enough to earn him an invitation to the UFC, but his debut fight would not be an easy one.

Lesnar wasted absolutely no time in dumping Mir on his back and firing some nasty shots from above. Then, referee Steve Mazzagatti makes a rather controversial choice, halting the action after Lesnar lands some punches to the back of Mir’s head. Theoretically, it’s the right call to make; Lesnar clearly lands at least four rabbit-punches at the video’s 11:08-11:12 mark. But how many times have you actually seen a UFC referee enforce that rule so quickly, without previous warnings? The Mazz deducts a point from Lesnar and re-starts the action with the fighters in a standing position. It’s a lucky break for Mir, who gets a moment to clear the cobwebs.

Read More DIGG THIS
CagePotatoMMA