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Tag: Yoshihiro Takayama

The Greatest Fights in MMA History Tournament: And the Winner Is…

Was there ever any doubt?

After four ferocious rounds of voting, we are pleased to announce that Don Frye vs. Yoshihiro Takayama (PRIDE 21, 6/23/02) has earned the title of Greatest Fight in MMA History! Frye vs. Takayama whipped Dan Henderson vs. Mauricio “Shogun” Rua 1 in the tournament finals, taking a full 68% of the vote. Along the way, the classic brawl beat out Fedor Emelianenko vs. Mirko Cro Cop, Kazushi Sakuraba vs. Royce Gracie 1, and Anderson Silva vs. Chael Sonnen 1 — not an easy path through the bracket, but Frye/Takayama made it look easy.

In honor of this momentous occasion, check out the Don Frye vs. Yoshihiro Takayama fight video above and the Don Frye quote-reel below. Thanks to everybody who voted, and if you have any ideas for future bracket features on CagePotato, let us know in the comments section!

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The Greatest Fights in MMA History Tournament: Vote Now in the Finals!

It all comes down to this. The semifinal round of our Greatest Fights in MMA History Tournament is in the books, and two finalists have emerged after a pair of close battles…

- Dan Henderson vs. Mauricio “Shogun” Rua 1 defeated Forrest Griffin vs. Stephan Bonnar 1, with 55.6% of the vote. And so, a recent epic replaces an older one in the pantheon of all-time great MMA fights. Had to happen eventually.

- Don Frye vs. Yoshihiro Takayama defeated Anderson Silva vs. Chael Sonnen 1, with 52.8% of the vote. I’m surprised it was this close. Kudos to Silva vs. Sonnen 1 for making it competitive, and for their scrappy underdog run in this tournament overall.

So which fight deserves to call itself The Greatest Fight in MMA History — Henderson vs. Rua 1 or Frye vs. Takayama? Vote now, and come back on Wednesday when we reveal the winner!

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CagePotato Roundtable #31: What Was the Greatest One-Round Fight of All Time?


(Don’t worry, this is the only time you’ll be seeing this guy on the list.)

With three of the fights on UFC 170‘s main card ending in the first round, the CagePotato.com staff has decided to revisit the greatest one-round fights in MMA history during today’s CagePotato Roundtable. Despite their brevity, these fights were memorable enough to be worthy of any discussion on the greatest fights in MMA history. Read on for our picks, and please continue to send your ideas for future roundtable discussion topics to tips@cagepotato.com

Nathan Smith


(Photo courtesy of MiddleEasy.com)

Greatest fight that only went one round, you say? Psh, please. How about a fight that had more total strikes thrown in the first 30+ seconds than in the entire multi-year relationship between that (piece of crap) Ike Turner and Tina? Ok, ok, maybe not that many but Don Frye vs. Yoshihiro Takayama still resulted in a shit load of punches. So, to all the other contributors to this RoundTable, I respect your opinions but much like the original Highlander – There can be only one – your choices are all The Kurgan (and he was “the hardest screw that ever walked a turn at Shawshank State Prison” mind you, so you can take solace in that you losers).

After a multitude of viewings, according to my bloodshot eyes and my bourbon breath, there were 91 total strikes thrown by both Don Frye and Yoshirho Yamasaka in the opening 34 seconds of their epic collision way back at Pride 21 in June of 2002. True, I am not Reed Kuhn and these figures are not exact like a Cagepotato Databomb but let those punch-stats sink in. For a little more than half a minute, almost 3 strikes were thrown per second with almost ALL of them landing.

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Meanwhile, in Professional Wrestling: Don Frye and Yoshihiro Takayama Have Sloppy, Kayfabe Rematch [VIDEO]


(Props: MiddleEasy)

I’ll get this out of the way up front: I’m not exactly a fan of remakes. Attempting to improve something that most people think is fine as-is usually results in the creation of something indefensibly stupid (like that 2002 remake of Rollerball) that will make everyone feel terrible about themselves (like how anyone who paid to watch that 2002 remake of Rollerball felt). This is especially true when the people remaking something completely miss the point of what they’re remaking, and decide to take out all the parts with social commentary and replace them with explosions and sideboob (You get the point).

So I guess it goes without saying that when All Japan Pro Wrestling attempted to recreate Don Frye and Yoshihiro Takayama’s PRIDE 21 encounter during a professional wrestling match last Sunday, I wasn’t exactly a fan. The fact that it happened during a tag team match also featuring Masayuki Kono and Keiji Mutoh didn’t exactly help things for me. Two things before we go any further – yes, fellow wrestling nerds, Keiji Mutoh used to be The Great Muta and no, I didn’t know he was still alive, either.

Video awaits after the jump.

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